Karl Bodmer: "Mandan Village," from Prince Maximilian of Wied's Travels to the Interior of North America, 1843-1844.
 
Photo: Courtesy Newberry Library, Chicago
Lewis and Clark exhibition lands at WSU's Ablah Library
Jan 18, 2008 12:24 PM | Print
Share

"Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country," a traveling exhibition, opened Saturday, Jan. 12, and will run through Friday, Feb. 22, at Ablah Library on the Wichita State University campus.

WSU Libraries is one of only 23 libraries nationally and the only one in Kansas selected to host the exhibit, along with four Native American sites in the United States.
 
It's an exciting exhibit, said Cathy Moore-Jansen, an associate professor and coordinator of WSU Libraries' collection development. It tells the story of the explorers' historic 1804-1806 expedition from a different point of view—that of the Indians who lived along their route. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and their small group of voyagers crossed the traditional homelands of more than 50 Native American tribes.
 
"The exhibit examines this momentous encounter of cultures," Moore-Jansen said, "and examines how that encounter affected the lives of the tribes which still live in the region."
 
"What often gets lost in the story is that Lewis and Clark did not explore a wilderness—they traveled through an inhabited homeland," said Frederick E. Hoxie, the exhibit's curator and Swanlund Professor of History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
 
"Lewis and Clark and the Indian Country" draws upon original documents in the Native American collections of the Newberry Library, Washington State Historical Society, Minnesota Historical Society and other institutions. Photographs of handwritten documents, maps, paintings and drawings complement large story panels.
 
In companion exhibits, WSU's Lowell D. Holmes Museum of Anthropology is lending its Plains Indian artifacts, and the Libraries' Special Collections and University Archives will feature 19th century maps, newspapers, drawings, letters and other writings that document the settlers' first impressions of what was to become Kansas.
For more information, contact Cathy Moore-Jansen, (316) 978-5080 or cathy.moore-jansen@wichita.edu.
Created on Jan 18, 2008 12:24 PM; Last modified on Feb 14, 2008 9:58 AM
#
HEADLINES RSS Feed
WSU makes case for special funding priorities
Revisions made to parking plan
High School Guest Program offering $500 scholarships
Collaboration to benefit WSU students
WSU camps introduce youth to engineering
Wichita has 'secret source' of IT talent
WSU School of Nursing benefits from grant
Multi-disciplinary field study
WSU Foundation finishes strong year
WSU director to speak on racial profiling
WSU research uses all types of people
Shuttle system adds new stops
Permits to be required to park on main campus
WSU names new director of AEGD program
WSU reorganizes admin structure
WSU, WuShock logo at IndyCar Series
WSU hosting ACT Prep Workshop
New Health Professions dean honored
Wichita State welcomes FarmHouse fraternity to campus
WSU grad overcame tragedy to earn her degree
Flint Hills Media Project covers Butler County
WSU to host forums for returning adults
'Forty Years/Forty Stories' at WSU museum
© 1995-2014 Wichita State University. All rights reserved.
Valid HTML 401