logo
WSU Newsline: Personal finance and economics education needed
Friday, August 27, 2010 9:00 AM

The scripts are available for printing and for sound bite identification.

Background:
In response to the nation's lingering economic and financial issues, the Kansas Council on Economic Education, hosted at Wichita State University, is asking Kansans to take action for the state's youth, equipping them to succeed in years to come. According to Jim Graham, president of KCEE, disregard for economic and financial education has contributed to our current national predicament.

Voice wrap:
Announcer: Is it possible that students who receive an otherwise good education may be illiterate when it comes to personal finance and economics? Jim Graham, president of the Kansas Council on Economic Education, hosted at Wichita State University, says education is an opportunity to learn for future generations.

Graham: "One of the problems in Kansas is that most schools do not have dedicated courses in personal finance and economics, and most don't incorporate the concepts into other subject areas."

Announcer: Last year, more than 600 Kansas elementary, middle and high schools participated in Kansas Council on Economic Education programs, but Graham says he won't be satisfied until every student in Kansas becomes literate in personal finance and economics. And there's a long way to go. This is Joe Kleinsasser at Wichita State University.

Sound bite #1
Graham says personal finance and economics topics can be incorporated into math, social studies and other courses. The sound bite is 14 seconds and the outcue is "practical applications."

Graham: "We can incorporate personal finance and economics topics in math, social studies, family and consumer sciences and other courses, and in doing so can actually make the other courses more meaningful and more engaging to the student by providing practical applications."

Sound bite #2
Graham explains why youth need to be taught personal finance issues. The sound bite is 17 seconds and the outcue is "count change."

Graham: "We need to teach our youth to know all they can about personal finance and economics because of the problems that have developed over the years with bankruptcies, people who are not credit worthy, people who misuse credit cards and people who can't even count change."

Sound bite #3
Graham says most youth aren't getting the information they need in personal finance and economics. The sound bite is 12 seconds and the outcue is "do become literate."

Graham: "One of the reasons that youth are not literate in personal finance and economics is because they haven't been trained, in most cases, at home or in the schools, and somebody must take charge and ensure that they do become literate."

Sound bite #4
Graham explains the mission of the Kansas Council on Economic Education. The sound bite is 15 seconds and the outcue is "and economics."

Graham: "The Kansas Council on Economic Education is a nonprofit organization, but it's affiliated with all six of the state universities in Kansas and hosted by the Barton School of Business at Wichita State. Our mission is to ensure that all students in grades K-12 become literate in personal finance and economics."

Sound bite #5
Graham explains the benefits of students becoming financially literate. The sound bite is 13 seconds and the outcue is "more knowledgeable consumers."

Graham: "By becoming economically and financially literate, the students become more responsible citizens, better employees, wiser savers and investors, and more knowledgeable consumers."

Sound bite #6
Graham explains what the KCEE provides teachers and students. The sound bite is 18 seconds and the outcue is "for Kids."

Graham: "The Kansas Council on Economic Education tries to reach as many students as possible by training their teachers. We also can provide all of the standards-based curriculum materials that are needed to teach personal finance and economics. We also provide several programs that are very popular with students and teachers, including The Stock Market Game, LifeSmarts and Financial Foundations for Kids."

Sound bite #7
Graham says many students are getting help, but the KCEE still has a long way to go. The sound bite is 11 seconds and the outcue is "long ways to go."

Graham: "Last year, more than 600 elementary, middle and high schools participated in our programs, but we won't be satisfied until every student in Kansas becomes literate in personal finance and economics. And we have a long ways to go."

# # # # #
Contact: Jim Graham, (316) 978-5165 or jim.graham@wichita.edu.