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WSU Newsline: Slight hearing loss affects nearly 1 in 5 teens
Tuesday, January 11, 2011 10:55 AM

The scripts are available for printing and for sound bite identification.

Go to http://www.wichita.edu/newsline to get the current Wichita State University Newsline. If you cannot access the Newsline at the Web address above, contact Joe Kleinsasser at (316) 978-3013 or cell (316) 204-8266 or joe.kleinsasser@wichita.edu. Newsline cuts may be edited to suit your needs.

If you have additional questions for Ray Hull after listening to the WSU Newsline, please call him at (316) 978-3271 or ray.hull@wichita.edu.

Background:
A recent national study reported that nearly one in five teens have lost some of their hearing. The results aren't surprising to Wichita State University audiologist Ray Hull, who says we live in a very noisy world.

Voice wrap:
Announcer: Nearly one in five teens have lost a little bit of their hearing, according to a recent national study. That comes as no surprise to Wichita State University audiologist Ray Hull.

Hull: "I really wasn't surprised when I read the information that there has been about a 70 percent increase in hearing loss among teenagers. We live in a very noisy world."

Announcer: Hull says even a mild hearing loss can be damaging to teens, in terms of their ability to hear in a classroom, for example. He says the problem is we can't see the damage that's taking place within the inner ear. Therefore, the loss of hearing may be occurring, but teenagers don't realize it until it's too late. This is Joe Kleinsasser at Wichita State University.

Sound bite #1
Hull talks about some of the factors contributing to hearing loss. The sound bite is 23 seconds and the outcue is "to their hearing."

Hull: "Of course, playing any personal stereo, particularly with the insert-type bud earphones, can cause damage if it's being played at too high of an intensity. If it's rattling against the side of the person's head, then you know that it's probably at about 105 decibels, at which time they can listen for about 15 minutes before permanent damage to their hearing."

Sound bite #2
Hull says even a mild hearing loss can affect teenagers in school. The sound bite is 15 seconds and the outcue is "for example."

Hull: "We know that about 75 percent of teenagers have at least some degree of hearing loss. Even a mild hearing loss can be damaging in terms of their ability to hear in a classroom, for example."

Sound bite #3
Hull talks about ways teens can reduce the chance of hearing loss. The sound bite is 16 seconds and the outcue is "through their system."

Hull: "There are two important ways that teens can monitor their own hearing and therefore reduce the chance of hearing loss. One is to limit the amount of time that they listen to their personal stereo to about 30 minutes. The other is to turn them down so that the person sitting next to them cannot hear what is being played through their system."

Sound bite #4
Hull explains why teenagers aren't getting the message on the dangers of hearing loss. The sound bite is 17 seconds and the outcue is "until it's too late."

Hull: "The problem is we can't see the damage that's taking place within the inner ear, the damage to the little nerve receptors. Therefore, the loss of hearing may be occurring, but yet we don't realize it until it's too late."

Sound bite #5
Hull says teens need to be aware of what can cause hearing loss. The sound bite is 20 seconds and the outcue is "to our hearing."

Hull: "Playing music that is too loud is one of many ways that our hearing can become damaged. Others include riding in a convertible, mowing the lawn without appropriate hearing protection, riding in a car with the windows down, and just so many. They're all cumulative and can result in permanent damage to our hearing."

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Contact: Ray Hull, (316) 978-3271 or ray.hull@wichita.edu.