logo
WSU Newsline: Good cardiovascular health can help us process what we hear
Wednesday, July 27, 2011 4:18 PM

The scripts are available for printing and for sound bite identification.

Go to http://www.wichita.edu/newsline to get the current Wichita State University Newsline. If you cannot access the Newsline at the Web address above, contact Joe Kleinsasser at (316) 978-3013 or cell (316) 204-8266 or joe.kleinsasser@wichita.edu. Newsline cuts may be edited to suit your needs.
If you have additional questions for Hull after listening to the WSU Newsline, please contact him at (316) 978-3271 or ray.hull@wichita.edu.

Background:
As we age, it's not uncommon to lose some hearing. Of equal concern is the ability to process what we hear. According to Wichita State University audiologist Ray Hull, improving cardiovascular health appears to be the best way to help process what we hear.

Voice wrap:
Announcer: Hearing is often taken for granted. It's not uncommon to lose some hearing as we get older, but Wichita State University audiologist Ray Hull says we often overlook something equally important, the ability to process what we hear.

Hull: "Improved cardiovascular health not only improves hearing somewhat, but certainly helps our ability to process and understand what we hear, to be able to make decisions about what we have heard."

Announcer: Hull says improving cardiovascular health appears to turn back our biological clock. And the good news, he says, is that it doesn't seem to matter at what age we begin — just that we start having a more active lifestyle sooner rather than later. This is Joe Kleinsasser at Wichita State University.

Sound bite #1
Hull explains what he means by processing what we hear. The sound bite is 10 seconds and the outcue is "for example."
Hull: "We're talking about our ability to process what we hear, to be able to make decisions about it, to be able to make financial decisions, for example."

Sound bite #2
Hull says there are more ways to improve hearing than to process what we hear. The sound bite is 20 seconds and the outcue is "that can happen."

Hull: "There are a number of ways to improve hearing, through hearing aids for example, surgery. But for central nervous system processing, we need a central nervous system that's working well, and improved cardiovascular health appears to be one way that that can happen."

Sound bite #3
Hull says one of the most important things we can do is to maintain an active lifestyle. The sound bite is 14 seconds and the outcue is "swimming, walking."

Hull: "One of the most important things that we can do to prevent an aging central nervous system and our ability to understand and process what we hear is to maintain an active lifestyle — aerobics, swimming, walking."

Sound bite #4
Hull says improving cardiovascular health appears to turn back our biological clock. The sound bite is 15 seconds and the outcue is "our biological clock."

Hull: "It doesn't seem to matter when we begin, that can happen at any age. But the most important thing is that improving our cardiovascular health appears to be able to turn back our biological clock."

Sound bite #5
Hull says processing what we hear doesn't have to get old. The sound bite is 9 seconds and the outcue is "doesn't have to get old."

Hull: "Hearing loss can occur for many reasons and at any age, but processing what we hear doesn't have to get old."

Sound bite #6
Hull explains why our ability to process what we hear tends to decline as we age. The sound bite is 14 seconds and the outcue is "less and less active."

Hull: "One of the reasons auditory processing, or the processing of what we hear tends to decline with advancing age, is that as people age, they become less and less active."

# # # # #
Contact: Ray Hull, (316) 978-3271 or ray.hull@wichita.edu.