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WSU Newsline: Suicide considered by many college-age youth
Tuesday, August 9, 2011 9:00 AM

The scripts are available for printing and for sound bite identification.

Go to http://www.wichita.edu/newsline to get the current Wichita State University Newsline. If you cannot access the Newsline at the Web address above, contact Joe Kleinsasser at (316) 978-3013 or cell (316) 204-8266 or joe.kleinsasser@wichita.edu. Newsline cuts may be edited to suit your needs.

If you have additional questions for Dasey-Morales after listening to the WSU Newsline, please contact her at (316) 978-3440 or maureen.dasey-morales@wichita.edu. 

Background:

For many young adults, college is the most exciting time in their life. For others, it's a time of despair, leading to suicide. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among people between the ages of

14 and 25 in the United States. Wichita State University psychologist Maureen Dasey-Morales talks about the warning signs and myths surrounding suicide.

Voice wrap:

Announcer: Going to college is exciting for many, but for others it's a time of hopelessness, and the result can be deadly. Every 100 minutes a teenager will commit suicide. And suicide is the second leading cause of death among people between the ages of 14 and 25 in the United States. Wichita State University psychologist Maureen Dasey-Morales explains one of the myths surrounding suicide.

Dasey-Morales: "One of the biggest myths about suicide is that asking somebody if they're thinking about hurting themselves will increase the risk of it happening. And in fact, asking is one of the main things somebody can do to prevent suicide from happening."

Announcer: Regarding someone struggling with suicidal thoughts, Dasey-Morales says, the biggest thing is to know there are options and that no one has to face the struggle alone. She said there's no shame or weakness in getting help. This is Joe Kleinsasser at Wichita State University. 

Sound bite #1

Dasey-Morales says college students can face an array of emotions. The sound bite is 15 seconds and the outcue is "and drive."

Dasey-Morales: "Students start college with a real range of emotions from apprehension to excitement to feeling high expectations for themselves and so can often feel a combination of pressure and drive." 

Sound bite #2

Dasey-Morales explains some of the risk factors for college students. The sound bite is 20 seconds and the outcue is "negative life experiences."

Dasey-Morales: "Risk factors for college students with suicide can be not having enough supports or not being willing to access their supports, alcohol and drug use, recent impulsivity, previous attempts or plans, as well as recent losses or negative life experiences." 

Sound bite #3

Dasey-Morales talks about some of the warning signs of someone considering suicide. The sound bite is 17 seconds and the outcue is "and impulsivity."

Dasey-Morales: "Warning signs can be withdrawal from others and from activities, moodiness, making a plan to hurt oneself, increase in use of alcohol or drugs, expressing a wish to die or to go away, and impulsivity." 

Sound bite #4

Dasey-Morales talks about one of the myths surrounding suicide. The sound bite is 20 seconds and the outcue is "to instill hope."

Dasey-Morales: "Another myth is that somebody who is thinking about hurting themselves is somehow weak or selfish. The reality is that most people who are thinking about hurting themselves feel like others would be better off without them or that somehow there isn't a way out for them, and so part of helping them is to instill hope."

Sound bite #5

Dasey-Morales looks at the best way to help prevent suicide. The sound bite is 25 seconds and the outcue is "and options for them."

Dasey-Morales: "The number one thing that somebody can do to help prevent suicide is to talk openly about it and to not be afraid to ask about it. Also, to not promise to keep the information you get secret because it is being open about it that prevents it. To be realistic and know that the person may still have a tough road ahead of them, but that there's hope and options for them." 

Sound bite #6

Dasey-Morales offers hope for someone struggling with suicidal thoughts. The sound bite is 18 seconds and the outcue is "in getting that help."

Dasey-Morales: "For someone struggling with these thoughts and actions, the biggest thing is to know that there are options, even if you don't see it. And that they don't have to try and struggle with this on their own, that everybody who struggles with this needs help, and there's no shame in getting that help. There's no weakness in getting that help."

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Contact: Maureen Dasey-Morales, (316) 978-3440 or maureen.dasey-morales@wichita.edu.