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WSU Newsline: Online banking grows, but some consumers still hesitant
Wednesday, September 17, 2008 9:32 AM

The scripts are available for printing and for sound bite identification.

Go to http://www.wichita.edu/newsline to get the current Wichita State University Newsline. If you cannot access the Newsline at the Web address above, contact Joe Kleinsasser at (316) 978-3013 or joe.kleinsasser@wichita.edu. Newsline cuts may be edited to suit your needs. If you have additional questions for Rick Lecompte after listening to the WSU Newsline, please contact him at (316) 978-3219 or rick.lecompte@wichita.edu.

Background:

The number of U.S. households banking online continues to grow. Jupiter Research projects the number of households banking online to jump from 29.3 million in 2003 to 56 million this year, and the percentage of those paying bills online to increase from 50 percent in 2003 to 85 percent in 2008. Rick LeCompte, a personal finance expert at Wichita State University, comments on the online banking phenomenon and why some consumers resist doing business online.

Voice wrap:

Announcer: One of the most attractive aspects of online banking is online bill paying. With a few clicks, you can pay your bills, check your balances and see what has cleared. But not all consumers are quick to join the growing number of people using online banking, as Wichita State University personal finance expert Rick LeCompte explains.

LeCompte: "A primary reason people don't switch to Internet banking is that they may not see a benefit to them. There can also be privacy concerns. There can also be the fact that they have unreliable Internet service, and maybe it's just too much difficulty for them to change."

Announcer: Whether you bank online or not, LeCompte says it's unlikely that brick and mortar locations will go away in the near future. There are many transactions that need to be performed in person, and some still like that personal touch of walking in and talking to the banker. This is Joe Kleinsasser at Wichita State University.

Sound bite #1

LeCompte says financial institutions are struggling to balance the needs of customers. The sound bite is 11 seconds and the outcue is "banking services."

Lecompte: "Financial institution firms are struggling to balance the needs of customers verses the cost they incur to provide Internet-type delivery of banking services.

Sound bite #2

LeCompte says financial institutions spend a lot of money to provide customers with security. The sound bite is 14 seconds and the outcue is "institution itself."

Lecompte: "Financial institutions expend tremendous amounts of funds and energy in order to provide their customers with security. They have to weigh this against the costs that they incur and also the benefits to their customers and to the institution itself."

Sound bite #3

LeCompte talks about how banks encourage customers to use the Internet. The sound bite is 19 seconds and the outcue is "able to offer."

LeCompte: "Banks encourage their customers to use the Internet in a variety of ways. Some are even (offering) cash reimbursements for setting up bill pay or setting up additional online accounts. They may also send out postal mailings in order to get customers to sign on for rewards programs and other types of benefits that the bank may be able to offer."

Sound bite #4

LeCompte explains why banks want you to do business online. The sound bite is 14 seconds and the outcue is "on deposits."

Lecompte: "The primary reason banks want you to do business online is that it reduces their cost. This can have the benefit of increasing their profits. It can also have a benefit of reducing the rate they charge on loans, and also increase the rates they're able to pay on deposits."

Sound bite #5

LeCompte says while online banking continues to grow in popularity, brick and mortar banks won't disappear anytime soon. The sound bite is 17 seconds and the outcue is "Internet."

Lecompte: "It's unlikely that brick and mortar locations will go away in the near future. There are many transactions that need to be performed in person. Also, some who will like that personal touch of walking in and talking to the banker, and banks also look at that as a different delivery mechanism, in addition to their Internet."

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Contact: Joe Kleinsasser at (316) 978-3013 or joe.kleinsasser@wichita.edu.
Created on Sep 17, 2008 9:32 AM; Last modified on Nov 19, 2008 11:43 AM