logo
Super Bowl ads are a high risk/high reward venture
Monday, January 26, 2009 10:05 AM

The scripts are available for printing and for sound bite identification.

Go to http://www.wichita.edu/newsline to get the current Wichita State University Newsline. If you cannot access the Newsline at the Web address above, contact Joe Kleinsasser at (316) 978-3013 or joe.kleinsasser@wichita.edu. Newsline cuts may be edited to suit your needs. If you have additional questions for Stephen Porter after listening to the WSU Newsline, please contact him at (316) 978-7105 or stephen.porter@wichita.edu.

Background:
Is advertising in the Super Bowl good business? Clearly advertisers who are willing to spend $3 million on a 30-second commercial think so. Wichita State University marketing professor Stephen Porter looks at some of the pros and cons of advertising during the Super Bowl.

Voice wrap:
Announcer: A record 97.5 million viewers watched the Super Bowl last year. No wonder advertisers are willing to pay a reported $3 million for a 30-second ad during this year's Super Bowl. Wichita State University marketing professor Stephen Porter says the challenge facing advertisers is that people are actually watching the ads to be critical and to be entertained.

Porter: "One of the key challenges of advertising around the Super Bowl is being able to develop an ad that people are going to remember. People view the Super Bowl differently. They expect more out of their ads. They're going to talk about those ads, and so the advertiser actually has to bring out their A game if they're going to be successful around the Super Bowl."

Announcer: Porter says it's hard to determine the success of a Super Bowl ad. Advertisers can measure brand recognition and brand recall, but ultimately what companies are after is a sale and whether consumers buy the product or service. This is Joe Kleinsasser at Wichita State University.

Sound bite #1
Porter looks at some of the issues companies look at when deciding whether to advertise in the Super Bowl. The sound bite is 19 seconds and the outcue is "promotion dollars."

Porter: "One of the key things that companies have to consider about advertising around the Super Bowl is the cost. This year the cost is $3 million for a 30-second spot, and a company's got to truly figure out — is that going to be a good investment of their promotion dollars."

Sound bite #2
Porter explains why some companies find advertising during the Super Bowl worthwhile. The sound bite is 16 seconds and the outcue is "the Super Bowl?"

Porter: "As a company looks at advertising around the Super Bowl, one of the key things that they've got to consider is, does their product fit the viewership of the Super Bowl? Is there a relationship between the target audience for their product and the people that are watching the Super Bowl?"

Sound bite #3
Porter says advertising during the Super Bowl is a high risk/high reward venture. The sound bite is 17 seconds and the outcue is "Super Bowl experience."

Porter: "There's tremendous risk in advertising around the Super Bowl for a company, because people — again — they view the Super Bowl ads differently. They're critical. They want to be entertained. And in fact, many people look at the advertisements as part of the Super Bowl experience."

Sound bite #4
Porter says people watch commercials differently during the Super Bowl. The sound bite is 19 seconds and the outcue is "as I did?"

Porter: "The challenge facing the advertising during the Super Bowl is that people are actually watching the ads to be critical, to be entertained. And one of the things that they have got to do is to understand this. It's not going to be, 'Oh, I bumped into the ad.' It's, 'hey, did you see the ad for XYZ and did you think it was as funny as I did?'"

Sound bite #5
Porter says it's tough to measure whether the Super Bowl ad is worth the investment. The sound bite is 32 seconds and the outcue is "or service."

Porter: "The key issue that a lot of companies are going to ask themselves — was my money well spent around the Super Bowl? And this is really tough. It's hard to determine if an ad was successful. There's always a lag time between the time that somebody may see the ad and purchase the product. We can measure brand recognition. We can measure brand recall, but ultimately what companies are after is a sale, and so the issue is going to be, you know, what was the water cooler talk? Do people remember the ad? And did they buy my product or service?"

# # # # #
Contact: Stephen Porter, at (316) 978-7105 or stephen.porter@wichita.edu.