College of Applied Studies Overview

The College of Applied Studies acts on our core values of Diversity, Integrity, Collaboration, Discovery and Leadership by listening to and acting on diverse perspectives and viewpoints. We further enact these ideals through relevant, intensive and fully integrated applied learning experiences for all of our students where they become leaders in a variety of career fields.


Core Values

Diversity

We value inclusion, diversity, and human dignity to create a productive and respectful environment for all.

Integrity

We are guided by trust, honor, and transparency in all interactions.

Collaboration

We create a culture of engagement and collaboration within our college, community, and the world.

Discovery

We embrace and promote intellectual curiosity as the process of questioning, testing, and refining to make sense of our world as lifelong learners.

Leadership

We build leaders empowered to positively influence the global community.


Policies and Procedures

Chapter 1 - College Organization and Governance

1.1 - Organization and Governance

Introduction

The WSU College of Applied Studies comprises four departments whose synergy provides a powerful understanding of life span development and academic innovation in living and learning. It prepares teachers, school professionals, school counselors, educational psychologists, exercise scientists, athletic trainers and sport professionals for 21st century careers. College faculty also contribute to the improvement of the profession at local, state, national and international levels through teaching, research and professional service.

Governance

Governance procedures, as described throughout this document, provide for organized faculty participation in setting college wide policy and procedures. Matters specific to the Professional Education Unit, which is housed within the college, are addressed in accordance with the policies and procedures described in the Professional Education Unit Manual.

Organization

Faculty

Faculty are those persons with the rank of clinical educator, instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, or professor, with some portion of their continuing full-time University appointment as a faculty member within the College of Applied Studies.

Administrators
  • Dean: The chief administrative officer of each degree-granting college is a Dean, who is responsible to the Provost and Senior Vice President for the leadership and general management of the college. Areas of responsibility of the dean include: college program development and future planning; determination of the educational, fiscal and physical plant needs of the college; development of the budget for the college; formulation of college-level recommendations concerning salary, appointment, assignment, promotion and dismissal of faculty and staff, based in part on the prior recommendations of chairpersons; and representation of the college and its programs both within the University and before professional and community groups.
  • Associate Dean: The Associate Dean is responsible to the Dean and assists the Dean in providing day-to-day management of college operations and policy implementation. Broadly speaking, the Associate Dean’s primary responsibilities pertain to the college’s advanced and non-teacher education programs, the strategic plan, college communications, the Technology Center, course schedules, the faculty mentorship program, and the college’s Advanced Program, Curriculum, Technology, and Unit Assessment Committees.
  • Assistant Dean/Accreditation Officer: The Assistant Dean/Accreditation Officer is responsible to the Dean. Broadly speaking, the Assistant Dean/Accreditation’s primary responsibilities pertain to initial licensure programs in the Professional Education Unit, CAEP/KSDE accreditation review process, the CAEP annual report, the Title II report, and the unit’s Initial Licensure Teacher Education Program and Accreditation Steering Committees.
  • Director of CAS Advising Center (CASAC): The Director of CAS Advising Center is responsible to the Dean. In addition to providing leadership in the areas of student support services, school/agency partnership development and liaison and undergraduate academic operations, the Director of CAS Advising Center provides administrative support for the Dean and may be involved, at the request of the Dean, in other operations within the College and Professional Education Unit.
  • Department Head/Chair: The Department Head/Chair is the front-line administrator in dealing with programs, faculty and student matters, and is responsible to the Dean. Policies pertaining to department leadership are specified in WSU Policies and Procedures section 4.13.
  • Staff: Other college administrative support positions include Assistant to the Dean, Business Manager, Data Management Coordinator, Licensure Officer/Assessment Specialist, Outreach Coordinator, Placement Coordinator and Scholarship Coordinator. Other staff members play important roles in the college, providing administrative support in the academic departments or CASAC.

The administrative structure of the college is depicted in Figure 1.1.

Diagram visually showing the Administrative Structure outlined in the text of this article.

1.2 – Standing Committees

Meetings of all standing College committees are considered open to all faculty, staff and students to attend, except for the Faculty Personnel Committee. Any standing committee dealing with personnel-sensitive subjects may declare executive session in which only committee members may be present. (Approved by Faculty April 28, 2005)

1.2.1 – Leadership Team

The College of Applied Studies Leadership Team is a unit in the college with the following purpose and authority, composition, and responsibility:

Purpose and Authority

The CAS Leadership Team shall advise and assist the dean with the governance and management of the college. The CAS Leadership Team functions within the broad framework of university policy as formulated by the Faculty Senate, the university administration, and the Kansas Board of Regents. All actions pertaining to the governance of graduate or advanced programs shall be subject to the approval of the graduate dean and the Graduate Council, and the Provost & Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and/or the president of the university.

Composition

The CAS Leadership Team shall be comprised of the following: (1) the dean, (2) the associate dean, (3) the assistant dean/accreditation officer, (4) the head/chair or one voting representative from each academic department, (5) director of CAS Advising Center and other faculty/staff members as deemed necessary by the dean and other CAS Leadership Team members defined above.

Responsibility

The CAS Leadership Team shall be responsible for providing leadership in the conduct of academic programs in the college by advising and assisting the dean with the following specific functions:

  1. Formulating appropriate goals, standards, policies, and procedures in college matters relevant to programs, personnel, organization and
  2. Systematically administering and coordinating college
  3. Planning and executing appropriate strategies for professional development.
  4. Introducing, discussing and resolving administrative matters essential to the daily operation of the college
  5. Other matters as determined by the committee
  6. The Committee maintains open communication to faculty/staff on its activities through pre-meeting distribution of agendas and post-meeting distribution of minutes.

Meetings

The CAS Leadership Team ordinarily shall meet at least on the first and third Thursdays of each month during the academic year, as necessary during the summer session, and subject to call for special meetings at the discretion of the dean.

Committee Actions

Proposed policy changes that broadly impact faculty or staff shall either (a) be referred, as relevant, to a college-wide faculty meeting or staff association meeting (with recommendation and rationale) or (b) be considered by each department faculty or staff association and feedback provided to the CAS Leadership Team which, after considering such feedback, shall determine what its policy recommendation to the dean shall be. The dean will apprise the Leadership Team of the disposition of its recommendations.

1.2.2 - Curriculum Committee

The Curriculum Committee is a duly authorized academic committee of the university with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities.

Purpose and Authority

The Curriculum Committee is responsible for reviewing and recommending to the Dean on all curricular matters for the College of Applied Studies.

Composition

The Curriculum Committee includes one representative from each department and one member of the CAS Leadership Team who is non-voting. Faculty representatives are elected by the faculty of their department for a three-year term. Department heads/chairs are not eligible for election. The chair of the committee is elected annually (usually in the spring preceding the chair term) from among the membership of the committee.

Responsibility

The committee recommends to the dean approval/disapproval of all actions (proposals, revisions, or deletions) in graduate or undergraduate courses, degree programs, or certification areas initiated by faculty and forwarded by the department head/chair. The committee membership is responsible for reviewing actions brought by individuals within their respective departments with other individuals directly concerned with the matter before a vote by the committee is taken.

Meetings

The Curriculum Committee meets monthly. Program curriculum change materials are normally due to the chair of the committee by the 3rd Thursday of the month. The chair may cancel meetings when there is no business for the committee to consider.

Committee Actions

The committee shall forward all recommendations to the dean.

1.2.3 - Diversity Committee

The Diversity Committee is a duly authorized academic committee of the university with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities.

Purpose and Authority

The Diversity Committee shall conduct reviews, establish initiatives and make recommendations on establishing and maintaining a diverse faculty and student body. In addition, the committee will be responsible for fostering an inclusive culture within the college.

Composition

The committee consists of at least 11 members with four faculty representatives (including non-tenure track) with at least one representative from each academic department in the college. Representatives are appointed by the dean for a two-year term based upon recommendations from departments chairs. The college’s representative on the President’s Diversity Council will be one of the faculty representatives and will serve as the committee chair. Additional members include the dean, associate dean, at least two students (one undergraduate and one graduate), at least one representative from the CAS Advising Center, at least one staff member and at least one community member. Representatives from other WSU bodies outside the college (e.g., committees, colleges, administrative offices, external community entities) may be invited by the committee to serve ex officio.

Responsibility

The committee is responsible for the following:

  • promoting and engaging in activities and initiatives to enact diversity-related goals in the college's strategic plan,
  • guiding the implementation of policies, procedures and activities intended to attain these goals, promotes relevant college policies,
  • coordinating its work as appropriate with related university bodies such as the President’s Diversity Council to facilitate CAS action on broader diversity and inclusion initiatives,
  • interfacing with the college's Assessment Committee to evaluate and report regularly to faculty and administration on progress toward these goals, and
  • in concert with the college's Leadership Team, organizing relevant professional development for faculty, staff and students.

The committee maintains open communication with faculty/staff on its activities through pre-meeting invitations and post-meeting distribution of minutes.

Approved by Faculty August 19, 2003
Amended by Faculty April 28, 2005
Revised by Faculty Sept. 13, 2019

1.2.4 - Faculty Personnel Committee

The Faculty Personnel Committee is a duly authorized academic committee of the university with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities.

Purpose and Authority

Each year, as scheduled by the university calendar, the Faculty Personnel Committee will deliberate and submit recommendations to the dean on regular cases and cases on appeal for faculty promotion and tenure. Each year, as requested by the dean, the committee also will deliberate and submit recommendations to the dean on: (a) policies and procedures for probationary faculty promotion and tenure and tenured faculty promotion; (b) credentials of probationary faculty for reappointment; and (c) applications for sabbatical leave. 

Composition

The Committee will consist of seven members, one elected at large and six elected within each of the departments: Intervention Services and Leadership in Education (2): School of Education (2); Human Performance Studies (1) and Sport Management (1). All full-time faculty within each department of the college except deans and department heads/ chairs are eligible to vote for department representatives. Faculty eligible to serve on this committee include all tenured faculty members holding full- time rank as associate professor or above. No faculty member can serve on the committee when his/her own credentials are being considered for promotion in rank or Professor Incentive Review.

Members will be elected for three year terms. Two members are elected each year except the third when one member shall be elected. Each department will elect an alternate whose major responsibility shall be to function as a member of the committee in instances of prolonged absence or resignation of a regular committee member. To lead its deliberations, the chair of the committee is elected biennially to a two-year term (usually in the spring preceding the chair term) from among the membership of the committee; by virtue of election as chair, a member's term may be extended by one year to accommodate the full chair term and delay department member election by one year. (Approved by Faculty August 15, 2012)

A vice-chair and a secretary shall be elected annually at the first meeting of the fall semester.  The chair's responsibilities will include scheduling committee meetings, establishing the agenda, disseminating results of committee action to the dean, meeting with the dean and a candidate (if requested) to discuss the recommendation, and serving on the University Tenure, Promotion and Academic Freedom Committee. The vice-chair will serve when the chair is absent or when the chair has a conflict of interest.  Responsibilities of  the secretary include preparing ballots and keeping a record of committee deliberations and actions.  Distribution of meeting minutes shall be restricted to the dean and to primary members of the committee.

Responsibilities

When primary and secondary files for promotion and tenure, along with supplementary materials, are presented to the committee for evaluation, the task of the committee will be to evaluate the materials as presented.  It is in the best interest of the candidates to seek counsel and advice from the department head/chair in the preparation of the documents.  If the committee discovers that information is lacking in a dossier, it can ask the dean to acquire the information.  The dean must provide the candidate a copy of added material and allow the candidate to   write a rebuttal.

When reviewing the credentials of a probationary faculty member for reappointment, and to assess progress toward tenure and promotion, the committee will examine the faculty member’s most recent Faculty Activity Record (FAR), related reflection and goals statements, and supporting documentation for the FAR.  It will also review evaluations conducted at the department level.  The committee will also request that the dean’s office provide copies of the faculty member’s previous FARs and related evaluations so the committee may gain a more complete understanding of the faculty member’s overall progress toward tenure and promotion. (Approved by faculty April 19, 2012)

During and after the deliberations of the committee on faculty promotion and tenure and all other personnel matters referred to it, members of the committee are bound to the strictest standards of professionalism and confidentiality, and votes will be by written secret ballot.  Except for members who have declared a conflict of interest, all committee members including the chair and secretary must vote on all recommendations for which they are present to hear deliberations.  The committee will submit its written recommendations to the dean, including the distribution of votes for each recommendation and the rank order of all candidates, as appropriate.

Meetings

The committee will be elected in the spring and will meet during the academic year at times deemed reasonable in terms of university deadlines appropriate to its purpose.

Revised by vote of the faculty April 18, 2018
Revised by Faculty October 15, 2021

1.2.5 – Non-Tenure Track Faculty Personnel Committee

The Non-Tenure Track (NTT) Faculty Personnel Committee is a duly authorized academic committee of the university with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities.

Purpose and Authority

Each year, as scheduled by the university calendar, the NTT Faculty Personnel Committee will deliberate and submit recommendations to the dean on regular cases and cases on appeal for NTT faculty promotion. Each year, as requested by the dean, the committee also will deliberate and submit recommendations to the dean on: policies and procedures for NTT faculty promotion; and (b) nominations for College of Applied Studies awards for teaching, research, and service; and Outstanding Staff Award.

Composition

The Committee will consist of five members. The committee will consist of at least one tenured faculty member and three non-tenure track faculty members. In the event that these criteria cannot be met, the dean will appoint eligible substitutions. One member will be elected within each of the departments: Intervention Services and Leadership in Education, School of Education; Human Performance Studies; and Sport Management. The fifth member will be an At-Large member, coming from any of the four departments with preference from the department with the largest faculty representation and may be nominated by the chair of that department to the current NTTP Committee with final selection made by the committee.  If all elected department representatives are of one classification (tenure or non-tenure), the fifth member must be of the other classification.

All full-time faculty are eligible to serve on the committee. All full-time faculty within each department of the college, except deans and department heads/ chairs, are eligible to vote for department candidates under review. No faculty member can serve on the committee when his/her own credentials are being considered for promotion.

Members will be elected for two-year terms on a staggered rotation. (Odd calendar years: ISLE, HPS, At-Large, if needed. Even calendar years: SOE, SMGT, At-Large, if needed.) Each department will elect an alternate whose major responsibility shall be to function as a member of the committee in instances of prolonged absence or resignation of a regular committee member. To lead its deliberations, the chair of the committee is elected biennially to a two-year term (usually in the spring preceding the chair term) from among the membership of the committee; by virtue of election as chair, a member's term may be extended by one year to accommodate the full chair term and delay department member election by one year.

The chair's responsibilities will include scheduling committee meetings, establishing the agenda, preparing ballots, keeping a record of committee deliberations and actions, disseminating results of committee action to the dean, and meeting with the dean and a candidate (if requested) to discuss the recommendation. A vice-chair shall be elected annually at the first meeting of the fall semester. The vice-chair will serve when the chair is absent or when the chair has a conflict of interest.

Responsibilities

When primary and secondary files for promotion, along with evaluations conducted at the departmental level, are presented to the committee for evaluation, the task of the committee will be to evaluate the materials as presented. It is in the best interest of the candidates to seek counsel and advice from the department head/chair in the preparation of the documents. If the committee discovers that information is lacking in a dossier, it can ask the dean to acquire the information. The dean must provide the candidate a copy of added material and allow the candidate to write a rebuttal.

During and after the deliberations of the committee on faculty promotion and all other personnel matters referred to it, members of the committee are bound to the strictest standards of professionalism and confidentiality, and votes will be by written secret ballot. Except for members who have declared a conflict of interest, all committee members including the chair must vote on all recommendations for which they are present to hear deliberations. The committee will submit its written recommendations to the dean, including the distribution of votes for each recommendation.

Meetings

The committee will be elected in the spring and will meet during the academic year at times deemed reasonable in terms of university deadlines appropriate to its purpose.

Approved by CAS Faculty, November 12, 2021

1.2.6 – Recruitment and Retention Committee

The Recruitment and Retention Committee is a duly authorized committee of the college with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities:

Purpose and Authority

The Recruitment and Retention Committee focuses on a comprehensive student recruitment and retention across all departments and programs within the College of Applied Studies.  

Composition

This committee includes one or more representatives (advisors, program chairs/faculty and/or department heads/chairs) from each academic department within the college,  , the Director of CAS Advising Center, Marketing and Communications Specialist for the college,  and at least one Dean representative (Associate and/or Assistant).

Responsibility

The committee has a broad responsibility for (a) addressing recruitment and retention efforts within the framework of the strategic enrollment management initiatives at the university level, (b) establish a comprehensive student recruitment and retention plan, (c) focus on efforts that actively recruit highly qualified candidates/students and attract candidates/students from underrepresented populations, and (d) utilize program and unit data to identify and remove potential problems or barriers and create solutions to promote enrollment and retention. Committee members are expected to take leadership roles in communicating and coordinating college committee actions and priorities with recruitment and retention planning and actions at the department level.

The chair of the committee is elected annually (usually in the spring preceding the chair term) from among the membership of the committee.

Meetings 

The Recruitment and Retention Committee meets usually once a month or as-needed basis. 

Committee Actions

The Committee shall work closely with the Dean representative (Associate and/or Assistant), and take actions as reasonable and within broad institutional policy on student recruitment and retention.

Revised by Faculty and Staff October 15, 2021

1.2.7 – Technology Committee

The Technology Committee is a duly authorized committee with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibility.

Purpose and Authority

The Technology Committee shall conduct reviews, take actions (as requested by the Dean, Leadership Team, or faculty) and make recommendations (to the Dean, Leadership Team, or faculty) on matters relative to advanced learning environments and the use of technology in the College of Applied Studies.

Composition

The committee will consist of at least one faculty representative from each academic department across the college with at least one staff member from the college, and the associate dean. Appointments are made by the dean for staggered two-year terms based upon recommendations from department heads/chairs). The chair of the committee is elected annually (usually in the spring preceding the chair term) from among the membership of the committee.

Responsibility

The committee promotes appropriate uses for technology and leads the college in technology planning. Functions within the purpose and authority of the committee may include;

  • reviewing technology needs and usage;
  • organizing (in concert with the college's Leadership Team) appropriate faculty/staff development;
  • advocating for needed technology equipment, support and funding;
  • promoting relevant college policies as related to technology;
  • serving in an advisory capacity for advanced learning environment and/or technology-related decisions and initiatives (e.g., collegewide funding proposals);

The committee maintains open communication to faculty/staff on its activities through pre-meeting distribution of agendas, post-meeting distribution of minutes and reports at college faculty/staff meetings.

Meetings

The Committee normally meets once each month during the academic year. Additional meetings may be scheduled throughout the calendar year as needed.

Committee Actions

The Committee shall work closely with the associate dean and assistant dean/accreditation officer in carrying out its responsibilities, making periodic reports and relevant recommendations to College of Applied Studies/Unit leadership, committees or other College of Applied Studies/Unit entities as relevant.

Approved 1/21/2022

1.2.8 - Assessment Committee

The Assessment Committee is a duly authorized committee of the CAS (and the Professional Education Unit) with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities.

Purpose and Authority

The Assessment Committee is responsible for providing faculty leadership and making recommendations on assessment matters for the CAS (and the Professional Education Unit).

Composition

The Assessment Committee includes one representative from each CAS department, a representative from the College of Fine Arts (FA) or Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS), and the associate dean and assistant dean/accreditation officer, both ex officio (with votes only in the case of a tie). College of Applied Studies members are elected by the faculty of respective departments in such a way as to have three-year staggered terms. The representative of Fine Arts or Liberal Arts and Sciences is appointed by the Unit Head, in consultation with the Deans of LAS and FA, and serves a 2-year term. The Chair of the Committee is elected annually from among the membership of the committee. Ordinarily, committee members are elected/appointed in the spring.

Responsibility

The Committee has broad responsibility for assessment in the Unit/College of Applied Studies, including the following specific responsibilities:

  1. providing broad faculty oversight in implementing the Unit Assessment System and associated program assessment plans,
  2. reviewing/monitoring specific program assessment plans and annual reports to provide constructive feedback for Program Committees (each program reviewed at least every 5 years),
  3. recommending/developing and reviewing assessment policies,
  4. reviewing aggregated unit assessment data, especially related to unit operations, to make recommendations in accordance with the Unit Assessment System,
  5. conducting periodic reviews of the Unit Assessment System, recommending modifications as appropriate, and
  6. periodically reviewing the Assessment Committee’s responsibilities to update as needed.

Meetings

The Assessment Committee meets during the academic year at times deemed reasonable in terms of meeting the Committee’s responsibilities

Committee Actions

The Committee shall work closely with the Associate Dean and Assistant Dean/Accreditation Officer in carrying out its responsibilities, making periodic reports and relevant recommendations to Unit/College of Applied Studies leadership, committees or other Unit/College of Applied Studies entity as relevant.

Approved 2/20/2020

1.2.9 – College Exceptions Committee

The College Exceptions Committee is a duly authorized committee of the CAS with the following purpose and authority, composition and responsibilities:

Purpose and Authority

The College Exceptions Committee considers student petitions for exceptions related to academic rules and regulations. This does not include grading matters handled by the Court of Student Academic Appeals. In addition, the College Exceptions Committee has responsibility for petitions specific to curriculum in undergraduate programs, except for exceptions specific to initial licensure programs within the Professional Education Unit. The College Exceptions Committee functions within the broad framework of University policy as formulated by the Faculty Senate, administration and the Kansas Board of Regents.

Composition

This committee includes one representative each from each of the college’s academic departments housing undergraduate programs, the Director of the College of Applied Studies Advising Center and the assistant dean/accreditation officer (as a non-voting member).

Members are appointed by the dean, based upon recommendations from department leaders, and serve for a term of three academic years, and are appointed in the spring. Upon approval, members can serve for more than three academic years if desired and if no other faculty member is requesting to serve.

Responsibility

The committee has responsibility for addressing exception requests as stated in a. Purpose and Authority. Petitions pertaining to rules and regulations stated in the Graduate Catalog fall under the authority of exceptions processes in the Graduate School.

Meetings

The College Exceptions Committee meets monthly.

Committee Actions

The Committee shall work closely with the Assistant Dean/Accreditation Officer and take such actions as reasonable and within broad institutional policy on All actions taken should be reported to the Assistant Dean/Accreditation Officer.

1.3 – Strategic Planning

The College of Applied Studies affirms the importance of planning in the long-range development of the college. To that end the college has established a mission statement and a strategic plan, and seeks to attain that mission through establishing, maintaining and monitoring progress toward strategic goals and action statements. As guidance, strategic planning, goals and action statements are to be consistent with the university mission, strategic plan, policies and procedures. Together with the college's mission statement, goals and actions statements are adopted by the faculty and staff of the college. In the spirit of collegiality and collaboration and as a basic principle, there is broad participation by constituents in their development, refinement and revision.

While the college's mission statement gives broad direction for the college, goals and action statements provide the more specific substance to that direction. Goals and action statements identify the particular emphases at a given point in time and shift to meet emerging circumstances, challenges and opportunities. College goals and action statements serve as a guide for particular goals and actions set by departments, programs, and individuals. They are not, however, intended to restrict the establishment of idiosyncratic goals or activities that support attainment of the overall college mission.

Formal review of the college mission statement, goals and action statements occurs at least once every five years, at least one year prior to the NCATE/CAEP on-site visit. However, modifications, additions or deletions in these may be made at any time by submitting such proposed changes to college faculty and staff through the Leadership Team. Insofar as possible and relevant, the Leadership Team and any ad hoc strategic planning committee it may appoint is responsible for ensuring broad input from constituents as part of the deliberation process.

College units and individual faculty/staff establish annual goals as part of the personnel performance appraisal process. These are to be keyed to college and department goals, as appropriate. College unit goals are to be consistent with the college mission and goals and adopted in sufficient time to guide individual goal setting by faculty and staff, typically early in the fall (for the following calendar year).

The Leadership Team and any ad hoc strategic planning committee it may appoint is responsible for monitoring (i.e., tracking) collective efforts toward attaining adopted college goals. They make periodic progress reports to faculty, staff and Dean’s Advisory Board.

Adopted by COEd faculty and staff on 2/22/01
Updated 8/1/2016

1.4 – Representation, Faculty Senate

College of Applied Studies representation on the Faculty Senate is aligned with the requirements and processes defined in the Faculty Senate Rules. As stated in the Faculty Senate rules, “Senators shall regularly convey to their units the business before the Senate, and shall share the views of their constituents with the Faculty Senate.”

WSU Faculty Senator allocation is calculated by the Rules Committee based on the number of eligible faculty in each college/division. The CAS’s preferred representation includes a faculty senator to represent each designated department. Representation should also include a minimum of two probationary/tenured and at least one non-tenure track faculty at all times. If the Senate Rules Committee calculates additional Senate seats above the number of departments in CAS, those positions will be designated CAS At-Large and represent the college rather than a single department. If the Senate Rules Committee calculates a reduction in CAS Senate seats below the number of departments in CAS, two or more departments should consolidate representation in consultation with CAS Dean. In the event a candidate is not nominated to represent a designated department, nominations will be elicited from faculty in other departments and voted on by all CAS faculty.

All CAS full-time faculty members are eligible to make nominations and vote on Senate vacancies in their respective departments. Similarly, all CAS full-time faculty are eligible to serve as the electorate for all CAS At-Large Faculty Senate positions.

CAS senators ordinarily are given the opportunity to report on activities and concerns of the Senate at college-wide faculty/staff meetings and may organize special meetings or special mechanisms to secure input from CAS faculty.

CAS senators ordinarily are given the opportunity to report on activities and concerns of the Senate at college-wide faculty/staff meetings and may organize special meetings or special mechanisms to secure input from CAS faculty.

Approved by the CAS faculty 4-22-2021

1.5 – Representation, Graduate Council

The College of Applied Studies has one representative on the Graduate Council. Qualifications, electorate and terms are set and elections conducted by the Graduate School. The representative is nominated and elected by the college graduate faculty.

Graduate Council representatives ordinarily are given the opportunity to report on activities and concerns of the Council at college-wide faculty/staff meetings and may organize special meetings or special mechanisms to secure input from Education faculty.

Chapter 2 - Personnel

2.1 – Salary and Selection for Lecturers, Graduate Teaching Assistants and Temporary Faculty

Lecturers and Graduate Teaching Assistants

Faculty in the College of Applied Studies believe that strong qualified practitioners have an appropriate instructional role in professional programs. Whether they are current/recent practitioners (hired as lecturers or temporary faculty) or graduate program candidates (hired as graduate teaching assistants) pursuing advanced preparation, such individuals bring practical expertise and the perspective of strong and recent professional experience to college programs. In the case of graduate teaching assistants, an added advantage is that the teaching responsibility can become part of that individual's advanced academic/professional preparation. Given the appropriateness and advantage of involving outstanding practitioners as instructors in professional preparation programs, it is ordinarily expected that most college programs will involve lecturers, temporary faculty, or graduate program candidate instructors in teaching at least one course in the program.

While there are significant advantages to involving outstanding practitioners, over-reliance upon lecturers, temporary faculty, and graduate teaching assistants can compromise program integrity and continuity. As such, each department establishes in policy ideal levels of lecturer, temporary faculty, and graduate student instructor usage for each program.

Each department is also responsible for establishing minimum qualifications, hiring procedures and appropriate staff development/expectations for lecturers, temporary faculty and graduate teaching assistants, as well as procedures for supervising and monitoring instruction and, insofar as possible, for ensuring a successful teaching and learning experience in program courses. Department heads/chairs are responsible for monitoring established target levels of lecturer, temporary faculty, and graduate program candidate instructor usage, for securing and maintaining a high quality lecturer pool, for following Graduate School policy on hiring graduate teaching assistants, and for ensuring department policy is followed on hiring and providing staff development/expectations.

Department policy must specify minimum qualifications of those hired to teach and/or supervise, ordinarily including academic (at least a masters degree) and experience qualifications relevant to the area of instruction and/or supervision. Instructor qualifications must also conform to Graduate School requirements insofar as apply.

This policy also identifies preparation and expectations for those hired to teach and/or supervise. At a minimum, those expectations should include (a) preparation on the conceptual framework, guiding program document (if any) and college mission/vision/core values, and (b) expectations to follow the course syllabus, conduct instruction/supervise consistent with the conceptual framework and guiding program document (if any), provide accreditation information and assessment data and conduct a course evaluation by students/candidates (e.g., SPTE II).

Standard procedures for hiring graduate teaching assistants and for securing and maintaining a high quality lecturer pool are developed by each department and, after approval by the dean, are maintained by the department head/chair.

Student/candidate evaluation of lecturers, temporary faculty, and graduate teaching assistants' teaching effectiveness must be consistent and used as an employment factor to ensure high quality teaching.

Salary

Salaries for lecturers reflect qualifications and experience of the individual and need/ availability of the particular expertise. For salary purposes, part-time lecturers are assigned as one of three levels: Level I, II or III. Each level connotes differential salary as determined by qualifications and experience teaching in higher education or providing staff development. Ordinarily these levels are defined as follows:

  • Level I — masters degree, or doctoral degree and little experience/documented effectiveness teaching in higher education or conducting staff development.
  • Level II — (a) masters degree, or doctoral degree, and documented effectiveness in teaching in higher education or conducting staff development, or (b) demonstrated expertise in a field where few alternative resources exist.
  • Level III — Same as Level II plus significant experience teaching for WSU with documented effectiveness as an instructor over multiple academic years; or demonstrated a national reputation in his/her field or have extensive experience working in higher education. (Exceptions to the above shall be approved by the Dean.)

Standard procedures for assigning and changing the salary level of lecturers is developed by each department and, after approval by the dean, is maintained by the department chair. Such procedures will include faculty input/involvement and will be subject to annual review by an appropriate departmental faculty group (e.g., department faculty personnel committee), whose report will go to department faculty, the department chair and the dean.

2.2 – Faculty Load

Faculty in the College of Applied Studies are expected to contribute through student-centered work (e.g. teaching), disciplinary/professional-centered work (e.g. research/creative activities) and community-centered work (e.g. service to their profession and the university/college/department).  These three forms of scholarship include areas in the discovery, integration, application, and education of knowledge (UniScope Model).  

Expectations for activity may vary between tenure-track and non-tenure track (NTT) faculty based on the nature of appointment. There is no research expectation for non-tenure track faculty, and the faculty member’s appropriate mix and extent of responsibilities are defined within their department by a role statement (4.27). 

WSU Policy 4.12 (Teaching Loads) provides further details about university-level policies for faculty workload (e.g. teaching, research/creative activity, service), including maximum course preparations and administrative procedures.  

As a general rule, College of Applied Studies department chairs will use 45 clock hours of faculty work time per semester as the equivalent of one load credit (WSU Policy 4.08). In other words, faculty work approximately 45 hours for every one credit hour of course load. Calculation of clock hours for load credit are accrued in one semester and may not include hours spanning multiple semesters. 

Where onerous time/effort are required, special teaching load credit may be given for additional or alternate activities* as specified by departmental policy and approved by the department chair and dean. Recognition of approved alternative activities as part/in lieu of teaching load credit will be initiated by the department chair and the department policy review process will include the Faculty Personnel Committee and Non-Tenure Track Faculty Personnel Committee. 

*Example alternate/additional activities include, but are not limited to the following: 

  1. Chairing students’ thesis, dissertation, and/or capstone projects. 
  2. Supervising clinical experiences, practicum, and/or internships. 
  3.  Performing onerous administrative duties for the ongoing function of departments, programs, centers, and initiatives (e.g. program chair, center director). 

Since the above alternate activities require varying levels of time/effort according to different departments and semesters, each department will establish equivalent teaching load credits that are consistent with university and CAS policy, based upon department chair and dean approval and issues such as budget, faculty availability, curriculum needs, and student demand. Departments will adhere to language in this policy stating that department chairs will use 45 clock hours of faculty work time accrued in a single semester as the equivalent of one load credit. Additionally, funded research as buy-outs may result in reduced teaching loads, and consistent success in attracting funded research may result in a modified faculty role description. 

In instances when faculty members are requested to exceed their normal teaching loads, they may, upon approval by the chair, the dean and in compliance with WSU policy 3.25 (Additional Compensation), receive extra compensation at the 2.2% of base salary per credit hour rate or its equivalent.

Approved by the faculty 9/25/03
Revised by the Leadership Team 12/1/1
Revised by CAS faculty 3/25/2022

2.3 - Faculty Mentoring Program

Mentor – Mentee Matching

  • New faculty members are eligible for voluntary participation as mentees during their first five years of their appointments.
  • Eligible mentors for probationary faculty include tenured faculty the CAS and related disciplines in LAS, and other colleges. Eligible mentors for non-probationary faculty are not required to be tenured, but they should be experienced WSU faculty members.
  • New mentees in the program may request specific mentors or receive recommendations from college leadership. The associate dean, in consultation with the dean and department head/chair, makes the final selection.
  • Finalization of a mentor assignment will be subject to both the mentee’s and mentor’s approval following a “get acquainted” lunch.
  • Returning mentees and mentors in the program will continue to work with the same partner unless they have requested otherwise.

Mentoring Process

  • Associate dean will provide information on how to serve as a
  • Leadership Team will be encouraged to identify topics for
  • At least two large group meetings of all mentors and mentees will be held each year.
  • Mentors and mentees are encouraged to go to lunch at least six times each year.
  • Topics for discussion between mentors and mentees may include, but are not limited to:
    • Balancing professional role responsibilities (teaching, research, service)
    • Balancing personal and work life commitments
    • Conducting research
    • Dealing with assessment matters
    • Engaging students
    • Enhancing and documenting effectiveness in teaching
    • Evaluating program and course effectiveness
    • Getting assistance when needed (where to go to voice concerns, get questions answered)
    • Meeting expectations in regard to professionalism
    • Participating in strategic initiatives
    • Understanding accreditation (HLC, CAEP, specialized program) and related processes
    • Understanding WSU policies and procedures
      • Key policies
      • Annual review / Faculty Activity Record
      • Curriculum changes
      • Tenure and promotion process
    • Mentors and mentees may also elect to conduct at least one mutual teaching observation each. This is purely voluntary on the part of both parties.

Compensation

  • Pending available funds, mentors will receive $880 ($700 base + 6 lunches @$30 each) for one year of service as a mentor.
  • Mentees are not compensated for their participation in the program.
  • Mentors are asked to cover the costs of the lunches for both themselves and their mentees. As indicated, lunch costs are included in the overall stipend.

2.4 –Teaching Evaluations

In accordance with WSU policy on faculty evaluation (WSU Policies & Procedures Handbook, 4.31), all faculty with at least half-time appointments (and unclassified professionals with at least 50 percent teaching workload) are to be evaluated at least once a year. By WSU policy, formal evaluation of teaching is required as part of the annual review, shall include multiple sources of data - including at least student survey instrument results, and shall be based upon departmental criteria statements. Evaluation of teaching for lecturers, graduate teaching assistants and temporary faculty also are required, which departments utilize for rehire/reappointment decisions.

2.5 - College Framework for Tenure and Promotion Criteria

The intent of this document is to assist the faculty in the College of Applied Sciences (CAS) tenure and promotion process. The CAS adheres to the general criteria for tenure and promotion to all academic ranks as stated in the Wichita State University (WSU) Tenure and Promotion Policies and Procedures.

General Principles

University tenure and promotion policy sets institutional criteria for awarding tenure and promotion at WSU and calls for the establishment of college criteria that are consistent with university criteria. Built upon the principle that decisions are most effective when they occur at a point in the organization closest to their implementation, the CAS sets specific tenure and promotion criteria in compliance with both CAS and WSU policy. Official criteria are maintained by the CAS Dean’s Office, periodically reviewed by the CAS Faculty Personnel Committee, approved by CAS faculty in a college-wide faculty meeting, and subjected to reviews and approvals as specified by university policies and procedures.

WSU Policy 4.21: Tenure and Promotion -University Guidelines and Criteria

The CAS asserts itself in this process by establishing criteria for tenure and promotion that sets parameters intended to assure consistency with the unit’s conceptual framework for professional educators and related disciplines as appropriate, as well as with the CAS mission and the university’s values as expressed through the WSU Strategic Plan.

The CAS, in alignment with the WSU Strategic Plan, values the following, which provides the framework for positive risk taking:

  • Student Centeredness: Promotion holistic student success through a supportive learning environment in which all of our students—past, present and future—continually thrive and grow.
  • Research and Scholarship: Accelerate the discovery, creation and transfer of new knowledge.
  • Campus Culture: Empower students, faculty, staff and the greater Wichita community to create a culture and experience that meets their ever-changing needs.
  • Partnerships: Advance industry and community partnerships to provide quality educational opportunities and collaborations to satisfy rapidly evolving community and workforce needs.
  • Inclusive Excellence: Be a campus that reflects and promotes—in all community members—the evolving diversity of society.

CAS Criteria for Tenure and Promotion

The general criteria or principles outlined here must be applied to tenure and promotion decisions in light of a detailed knowledge of the specific goals of each department and the CAS and the specific qualities and competencies of the individual. Tenure and promotion criteria are generally cast into three areas of scholarship, Teaching, Research and Creative Activity, and Service along with four key functions of each scholarship labeled as Discovery, Integration, Application, and Education of knowledge (Hyman et al., 2002). However, in acknowledgment of the broad importance of a pervasive sense of community in attaining the CAS mission, the notion of collaboration/teaming/cooperation within and across programs, departments, colleges, the university, and community should be an acknowledged theme across all departmental tenure and promotion criteria. The following discussions explicate how the three areas of scholarship are, theoretically, integrated with the four key functions of scholarship.

Tenure and promotion decisions shall be based on recognized performance and achievement in each of the several areas, as appropriate to the particular responsibilities assigned to the faculty member. In employing the scholarships of Teaching, Research and Creative Activity, and Service, the Tenure and Promotion Policy recognizes that an individual’s activities may fall within or across two or more scholarships. Faculty members are encouraged to articulate the interdisciplinary nature of their work.

Promotion

A terminal degree in a field appropriate to the discipline in which the candidate teaches or conducts research and creative activity is normally required for appointment or promotion to the rank of assistant professor, associate professor, or professor. Exceptions to this guideline will require careful documentation based upon an adequate rationale. Under normal circumstances, a faculty member should not expect to be considered for promotion with less than six years in rank. The standards for teaching, research, and service for each rank are indicated below. The relative significance of teaching, research and creative activity, and service may vary from case to case.

In the case of both mandatory and non-mandatory reviews for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor, candidates must meet the criteria for tenure and promotion as established in University policy. A favorable recommendation for tenure automatically carries a favorable recommendation for promotion to Associate Professor. (This paragraph added May 14, 2018 in alignment with revised university tenure and promotion policy).

Assistant Professor

Evidence is normally expected of the following: demonstrated effectiveness in teaching; potential for achievement in research and creative activity; and some service appropriate to the mission of the department and college.

Associate Professor

Evidence is normally expected of the following: documented effectiveness of teaching; a record of research and creative activity that has earned recognition in professional circles at the regional or national level; and (3) some professional or university service.

Professor (and Professor Incentive Review)

Evidence is normally expected of the following: sustained effectiveness in teaching; a record of substantial accomplishment in research and creative activity which has led to recognition in professional circles at the national or international level; and demonstrated academic leadership in the form of service to the department, college, university and the profession.

WSU Policy 4.25: Full Professor Incentive Review Program

Tenure Procedures

All full-time (probationary) faculty with 50 percent or more responsibility for teaching; research and creative activity with the rank of instructor or higher must undergo review for tenure during their sixth year of employment at WSU unless their employment at WSU is to be terminated at the end of their seventh year of service. Those individuals given credit for prior experience in higher education at the time of initial appointment shall undergo review for tenure according to the policies stated.

Expectations of performance in and the relative importance of teaching; research; and service will be defined at the time of the initial appointment. Specific performance goals will be established each year during the annual evaluation of untenured faculty. These expectations and goals form the foundation for evaluation for tenure in the context of the tenure criteria established by the faculty of the CAS, but do not constitute a definitive review for tenure. The terminal degree is preferred for the granting of tenure except in exceptional and well-documented cases. The award of tenure normally requires documented evidence of effective teaching and a record of research and creative activity that has earned recognition in professional circles at the regional or national level.

Joint Appointments

CAS faculty with joint appointments will be evaluated by their Primary Department. Decisions or recommendations regarding tenure and promotion are the responsibility of the administrative head of the Primary Department and shall be consistent with the policies and procedures of that administrative unit. Candidates are encouraged to solicit documented input from the secondary department. The Primary Department may use such input from the secondary department when making tenure and/or promotion decisions.

Scholarship of Teaching

In a college whose primary purpose is the preparation of education, mental health, and physical activity professionals, effective teaching is an important criterion for tenure and promotion. Faculty in the CAS should be pedagogical leaders in their fields as well as provide effective student advising and mentoring, ensure students have applied learning experiences, incorporate innovative techniques, and encourage the development of interdisciplinary courses. Types of teaching scholarship include theoretical, technical, clinical, professional, special, and general pedagogy.

The modes for delivery of instruction may include face-to-face, distance and extension education, technical workshops and seminars, exhibits, performances, addresses, speeches, and public broadcast media. Audiences for teaching scholarship generally include undergraduate students, graduate students, postgraduates, professionals in the field, certificate students, special interest groups, and the general public.

Effective teaching within the CAS is defined as a command of the subject area content, organized and enthusiastic presentations, establishment of objectives and evaluation methods for each class, and the ability to employ effective strategies to meet specific class needs without lowering standards. Faculty are expected to revise their courses regularly to keep them relevant, on the cutting edge of new knowledge, and based upon research in their fields. Faculty whose teaching is consistently of a low quality will be expected to improve their performance.

Evidencing adequate levels of the Scholarship of Teaching includes: classroom instruction and practicum/internship supervision; curriculum and innovative program development; student research; and academic advising.

Classroom instruction and practicum/internship supervision

In order to document effective teaching, faculty must provide the course number, title, number of students, and whether the course was individually or team-taught. Independent studies, blue-carded courses, and cooperative education should be clearly indicated. Documented evidence of effective classroom instruction/supervision is crucial for successful tenure and promotion. At a minimum, required evidence for documenting effective classroom instruction and/or practicum/internship supervision includes:

  • Syllabus for each course
  • Concise compilation of results from student evaluations and comments, using the required CAS instrument (e.g., SPTE)
  • Findings from student comments from such sources as student evaluations, formal interviews, or exit surveys should be presented by a summary statement that conveys the students’ sense of strengths and weaknesses

Additional or optional mechanisms for documenting effective classroom instruction and/or practicum/internship supervision may include:

  • Additional course evaluations (e.g., IDEA)
  • Peer and/or department chair review of teaching (based on in-class performance or recorded presentation) and/or internal letters about teaching effectiveness
  • Statements from administrators that attest to the candidate’s teaching and advising effectiveness
  • Examples of support materials (e.g., tests, handouts, etc.)
  • Examples of student outcomes/products (e.g., projects)
  • Guest lecturing in another faculty member’s class
  • Reflective analysis of teaching (i.e., synthesizing information from different sources) to implement possible changes
  • Specific course improvements, changes made as a result of evaluation and reflective analysis
  • Awards or other external recognitions for teaching
Curriculum and innovative program development
  • Teaching a course for the first time
  • Developing a new course
  • Significantly revising an existing course
  • Program development and/or modification
  • Using new and innovative techniques
  • Developing an interdisciplinary course and/or program
  • Developing unique applied learning or research experiences for students
Student research
  • Supervision of, and membership on, graduate and undergraduate dissertations, theses, projects, monographs, performances, productions, and exhibitions required for degrees (serving as chair of a student research project committee will be considered to require more time and effort than serving as a member)
  • Insights gleaned from supervision of student research
Academic advising

Academic advising is another component of the scholarship of teaching. While the process of advising differs between undergraduate and graduate programs, all advisors are expected to: be accessible to assist students with academic questions; be knowledgeable about programs, policies, and procedures; provide accurate and timely information to students; be professional in relating to students; assist students in the development of meaningful educational plans that are compatible with their professional goals; and provide assistance in refining goals and objectives, understanding available choices, and assessing the consequences of alternative courses of action. Documenting academic advising could include the following:

  • List of advising responsibilities
  • Evidence of effective academic advising of departmental majors as determined by either a department evaluation form or by peers and/or the chair
Faculty development activities
  • Participation in workshops
  • Participation in conferences
  • Being/having a faculty mentor
  • Securing and/or maintaining certification/licensure
  • Pursuit of advanced degrees and/or further academic studies

Scholarship of Research and Creative Activity

The discovery, integration, application, and transmission of knowledge in a field of study is what uniquely distinguishes the university from other levels of post-secondary study. Such scholarship is a critical element of the CAS mission.

Faculty must show evidence of original and innovative research and creative activity appropriate to their established role description and departmental/college goals and strategic plans. Effective research and creative activity is defined in the CAS as activity that (a) increases, organizes, explains/redefines, and/or synthesizes the knowledge, or (b) generates new processes and products that contribute to a faculty member's profession, discipline and/or broader society. Research may be basic or applied, or both, in nature. Paper presentations and publications are expected in order to establish and maintain a broad agenda of scholarly inquiry and writing. Grant proposals are also considered part of scholarship. The agenda may be focused or broad-based with several lines of inquiry.

Collaboration

The CAS values multidisciplinary and integrative research as well as individual research. The CAS also recognizes the importance of cross-disciplinary teams that can integrate creative works from several fields.

Quality and quantity

Scholarly contributions are reviewed based on the quality of the product, consistency of effort, and continued submission within the faculty member's profession or discipline. Quantity of scholarly artifacts should not be the sole criterion for judging scholarly productivity. Relevance to the field, impact upon development of the field or professional practice, quality (as judged by peer review or literature citations), and comprehensiveness should be considerations in setting tenure and promotion criteria for scholarship of research and creative activity.

Venues

As a professional school, the CAS values scholarship produced for practitioner consumption as well as more traditional publication venues. Depending upon the discipline, a faculty member's body of work can provide a balance between presentations at research, practitioner, and virtual conferences, and publication in peer-reviewed and editorial-reviewed outlets, including journals exclusively published online. However, publication of national/international peer-reviewed books and book sections (e.g., book chapters) and in peer-reviewed journals remains the highest standard for publication and faculty are encouraged to pursue these outlets for their scholarship. Faculty should provide evidence of the impact their work. Impact on the field may be documented through citations, acceptance rates of journals and conferences or other means such as outcomes associated with the work. Faculty members are expected to clearly identify types of research and creative activity (e.g., journals, professional publications, books, book chapters, conference proceedings) and form of review (e.g., peer-review, editorial or other form of review). Research and creative activity may be documented by the following:

Research, scholarly publications and public intellectualism

Regarding written works, citations should include beginning and ending page numbers or total number of pages, where appropriate. For multi-authored works, the contribution of the candidate should be clearly indicated (e.g., co-author, senior author, supervised person who authored the work, etc. and percent of contribution). Typically, order of authorship reflects the degree of contribution with regard to the finished product. Explanations should be provided in cases that depart from this tradition. Impact of research scholarship and creative accomplishments within the profession and society as based on citations, readership (e.g., downloads of materials) or other forms of professional acknowledgement should be provided.

Indicate if peer reviewed. Publications and/or public intellectual discourse includes:

  • Articles published in academic journals
  • Books including major revisions of previously published books
  • Parts of books
  • Book reviews
  • Conference proceedings
  • Research abstracts
  • Research reports to sponsors
  • Manuscripts accepted for publication substantiated by letter of acceptance
  • Manuscripts submitted for publication, with an indication of where submitted and when
  • Manuscripts in progress
  • Articles published in non-academic journals and trade magazines
  • Publications that translate or reword academic work for a different audience
  • Articles published in in-house publications
  • Cooperative extension bulletins and circular
  • Legacy and/or digital media (e.g., blog, podcast, etc.) that contribute to the public intellectual discourse
Creative activity
  • Exhibition, installation, production, or publication of original works of architecture, dance, design, electronic media including instructional videos, film, journalism, literature, music, theatre, and visual art that contributes to public intellectual discourse
  • Performance of original dance, literary, musical, visual arts, or theatrical works or works from traditional and contemporary repertories of the performing arts
Presentations and outreach activities
  • Presentations at technical and professional meetings at local, state, regional, national, and international levels (keynote speaker, invited speaker, general session speaker, research-based paper presenter, poster session, panel member, discussant, facilitator). Presentations will be considered as research and creative activity whether such are presented once or recast to address the needs of different audiences.
  • Description of outreach or other activities in which there was significant use of candidate’s expertise (consulting, journal editor, reviewer for journals or presses, reviewer of grants, etc.)
Projects, grants, contracts, and emerging forms of research
  • Grants awarded (fully processed financial award)
  • Pending grants (submitted proposal that is awaiting funding status from sponsor)
  • Grants not funded (notification received from sponsor or principal investigator that proposal was not funded)
  • Contracts awarded
  • Effectively manages funded grants or contracts
  • Accelerating the discovery, creation, or transfer of new knowledge via inventions, innovations, or technologies that are market driven
  • Products developed
  • Invention disclosures
  • Patents applied for or granted
  • Technology developed, transferred, or adapted in the field
  • Software programs developed
  • Technical assistance provided
  • Development of, or involvement with, multi-disciplinary and integrative research teams
  • Development of, or supervision of, research laboratories
  • Applications of research scholarship in the field including new applications developed and tested; new or enhanced systems and procedures demonstrated or evaluated for government agencies, professional and industrial associations, educational institutions, etc.

Additional or optional mechanisms for documenting effective research and creative activity

  • List of honors or awards for scholarship or professional activity
  • Other activity that significantly contributes to the faculty member's profession or discipline that meets the criterion of scholarly activity

Scholarship of Service

Effective service is defined as activities performed by a faculty member that benefit the department, college, university, community, society or the profession. Service activities are performed in many capacities and involve substantive contributions to a variety of communities including to the university, society, and discipline or profession. Scholarship of service contributions to the university, society, and the profession will be evaluated based upon activities within the university and beyond. These activities will be documented and judged relative to the level at which they are performed (i.e., college, department, university, community, profession), the extent of time involved, and the significance of their impact. The service area includes a broad range of activities related to the intellectual work of the faculty member where theory and practice interact and one renews the other. The faculty member must document his/her time commitment and provide some evidence of how the service related to the fulfillment of goals related to impacting the department, college, university, community, society or the profession.

Service to the university includes:

  • Record of committee work at college, department, and university levels
  • Participation in campus and/or university-wide governance bodies and related activities
  • Serving as a program director/chair/coordinator
  • Participation in accreditation activities
  • Record of administrative support work (college representative, faculty mentoring, assessment activities, etc.)
  • Record of contributions to the university's programs to enhance equal opportunity and cultural diversity
  • Assistance to student and/or alumni groups/organizations
  • Participation in program, department, college or university recruitment and retention activities
  • Participation in development/fundraising activity

Service to society includes:

  • Participation in community affairs
  • Service to governmental agencies at the international, federal, state, or local levels
  • Service to public and private organizations
  • Service to citizen/client groups
  • Testifying as an expert witness

Service to discipline or profession includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Record of membership in professional and learned societies
  • Organizing conferences and/or service on conference committees
  • Active participation in professional and learned societies (e.g., offices held, committee work, and other responsibilities)
  • Other examples as documented

Other service activities that enhance the university's image, represent the university to the public, further the university's goals and direction, or employ one's professional competence to benefit the public.

Administration

Faculty members are sometimes asked to undertake administrative roles where they coordinate significant program, departmental, college, or university activities. Given the importance of these activities to these entities, criteria should distinctly identify ways to document activity in management roles. This may be recognized formally with separate load recognition (e.g., 40-30-20-10).

Promotion Criteria for Non-Tenure Track Faculty

Performance decisions of non-tenure track faculty shall be based on recognized performance and achievement in areas appropriate to the particular responsibilities assigned to the faculty member as outlined in University Policy 4.27. As there is no research expectation for non-tenure track faculty, promotion assessments will focus on the candidate’s effectiveness and achievements in the scholarships of Teaching and Service, as described previously in this policy. Similar with tenure-track faculty, non-tenure track faculty members are encouraged to articulate the interdisciplinary nature of their work.

Candidates will be evaluated by the CAS Non-Tenure Faculty Personnel Committee. Typically, a faculty member should not expect to be considered for promotion with less than six years in advancement levels with successively higher levels of achievement expected for each level of promotion. Exceptions are for individuals who were given credit for prior experience in higher education at the time of initial appointment. A terminal degree in a field appropriate to the discipline in which the candidate teaches is normally required for appointment or promotion to the rank of Assistant Teaching Professor, Associate Teaching Professor, and Teaching Professor; and Assistant Clinical Professor, Associate Clinical Professor, and Clinical Professor. Candidates may be hired to the following levels in the absence of a terminal degree: Assistant Educator, Associate Educator, and Senior Educator. Exceptions to this guideline will require careful documentation based upon an adequate rationale.

WSU Policy 4.27 / Promotion for Non-Tenure Track Faculty: Guidelines and Criteria

Reference

Hyman, D., Gurgevich, E., Alter, T., Ayers, J., Cash, E., Fahnline, D., . . . Roth, D. (2002). Beyond Boyer: The UniSCOPE model of scholarship for the 21st century. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 7(1&2), 41-65.

Approved by the faculty 2/20/2020

2.6 – External Letters of Review for Candidates for Tenure and/or Promotions

WSU Policy 4.24 mandates the use of the external reviews in all tenure and promotion reviews and specify the requirements and process for said reviews. External reviewers should be distinguished scholars or recognized authorities in their fields capable of providing an unbiased professional assessment of the quality of the candidate's work. Individuals who potentially have a conflict of interest and therefore are unable to provide an unbiased professional assessment of a faculty member's scholarship are:

  1. Master's thesis advisor or committee member
  2. Dissertation advisor or committee member
  3. Colleague or co-author on grant, publication, and/or other scholarly/creative activity
  4. Colleague on an outside university/WSU partnership (example, another university partners with WSU for offering courses). This requires working relationship between participating faculty.
  5. Colleague who has been on faculty in the WSU CAS

2.7 - Granting of Tenure and Rank During the Search and Hire Process

The university policies in the WSU Faculty Handbook suggest in section 3.5 that the award of tenure with initial appointment shall be initiated by the tenured faculty of the relevant academic department in accord with college and university guidelines in force at the time. It is the feeling of the Faculty Personnel Committee (FPC) that a faculty review should take place whenever tenure or advanced rank is being considered.

To expedite the process during the search the committee suggests: The names submitted to the chair and/or dean for possible interview will be forwarded to the dean with votes for tenure and rank, when appropriate.

  1. The search committee, when they realize the candidate may wish to be granted tenure or advanced rank at the time of hire, will make that fact known to the department head/chair.
  2. The department head/chair will convene those eligible to vote on awarding tenure and/or rank and appoint a
  3. That committee will review the vita in question with regard to the criteria and guidelines for tenure and/or rank in order to make a recommendation to the dean. This recommendation will accompany the search information and recommendations.
  4. The department head/chair will make a separate recommendation and forward both recommendations to the dean
  5. The dean will advise the chair of the CAS FPC of the recommendations for tenure and/or
  6. The chair of the CAS FPC will review the recommendations of the department faculty, checking to see that the guidelines and criteria have been followed-- unless there is concern about the recommendation, at which time the full committee will be The FPC chair's review will constitute the CAS FPC’s recommendation to the dean.

Adopted by COE Faculty December 11, 1997

2.8 - Review of Candidates for Tenure and/or Promotion in Departments Having Fewer than Three Eligible Faculty Members for a Departmental Review Committee

University policy 4.18 specifies the procedures for the review of tenure and/or promotion applications. The policy states that in departments having fewer than three voting tenured faculty members, the college faculty will develop appropriate procedures for the review, subject to the approval of the college dean. For the College of Applied Studies, those procedures follow:

Selection of Reviewers

From a roster of eligible College of Applied Studies faculty, the chair of the Faculty Personnel Committee will forward to the department head/chair the names of seven persons who have been recommended by the Faculty Personnel Committee and who have agreed to serve. The list must include the name(s) of persons from the candidate's department who hold the appropriate rank. Department heads/chairs and assistant/associate Deans, except for the head/chair of a reviewed individual's department (who conducts an independent review), are eligible for service.

Selection of the Review Committee

From the list recommended by FPC, the department head/chair will choose a committee of five, including the department member(s) who the appropriate rank. No more than two external members may be from the same department, and no more than one member shall be a currently serving department head/chair or assistant/associate dean.

Amended by the FPC on 9/6/06

2.9 - College of Applied Studies Teaching, Research, Service and Technology Innovation Awards

The Awards

The recipient of an award for teaching, research, service, or technology innovation will receive a cash honorarium and photographs of award winners will be displayed in Corbin Education Center.

Description of Categories

The Emory Lindquist teaching award should recognize documented evidence of classroom performance. Evidence may include any of several student evaluation or perception forms, peer evaluations, and administrators' observations.

The research award should recognize either published or creative work, and may include both data-based research and conceptual publication.

The service award should recognize activities ranging from the departmental to the national level. Activities may include advising, recruitment, or leadership in student activities. Service to the College or to the University may include elected, appointed, or voluntary activities that have some special impact on the university community. Service to the professional educational community may be local, state, or national in scope.

The technology innovation award recognizes innovative use of technology either as an element of pedagogy (i.e., approach to instruction) or as the subject of instruction (i.e., innovative uses of technology within a profession for which a student is being prepared).

Nominations for Awards

Department heads/chairs, faculty and academic professional staff may nominate members of the College of Applied Studies faculty and academic staff for awards in any or all four categories. They need not nominate anyone, they may not nominate themselves, and they may not nominate the same individual for more than one category. They may nominate more than one person for a single category. For each nominee, they should forward a one-page narrative to the chair of the Faculty Personnel Committee. Supporting evidence should be attached. The evidence should be limited to the preceding five years with an emphasis on the most recent years. An award winner may be eligible for nomination in the same category after 3 years. The chair of the Faculty Personnel Committee will provide the names of ineligible persons in the call for nominations. (To assist the chair, a list of award winners is maintained in the dean’s office.)

All nominations and support documentation are considered active for two years and, excluding award recipients, will be considered by the Faculty Personnel Committee in both years. The Faculty Personnel Committee may request updated documentation (e.g., SPTE scores) from relevant department heads/chairs for nominees in the second year of consideration.

Students may nominate faculty members from any department in the College of Applied Studies for the teaching award through the following procedure.

Procedure for nomination by students for a teaching award

The Faculty Personnel Committee will send the following letter to a random sampling of 5% of College of Applied Studies undergraduate students and 5% of graduate students who are currently enrolled full-time or part-time. For student nominations for the college teaching award, the relevant department chairs will be asked by the Faculty Personnel Committee to provide a letter, SPTE scores or other added support documentation.

Selection of award winners

Evaluation of nominations made by department heads/chairs, faculty, and staff for teaching, research, and service awards will be based upon criteria established for each award as supported by evidence provided by the nominator, together with the nominator's narrative as related to those criteria. Evaluation of the nominations by students for the teaching award will include students' written justifications for their nominations. Criteria for the technology innovation award are established by the college Technology Committee; criteria for other awards are established by the Faculty Personnel Committee.

The Faculty Personnel Committee will make only one award in each category, but need not recommend an award in any category. FPC selection of the recipient for the technology innovation award will include input from the college Technology Committee.

The two most recent eligible recipients of the college teaching award will serve as the College of Applied Studies’ nominees for the WSU Excellence in Teaching Award. Nomination packets for these individuals for the WSU award will be prepared jointly by the relevant department head/chair in collaboration with the Faculty Personnel Committee and submitted through the dean.

2.10 - College of Applied Studies Outstanding Non-Instructional Staff Award

Each year the College of Applied Studies gives recognition and a monetary award to honor one outstanding non-instructional staff member in the college. The chosen employee is recognized during the same ceremony at which faculty recognition is given to teaching, research, and service award recipients. If the college is given the opportunity to nominate a non- instructional staff member for a university award, a nominee will be selected from the pool of persons who have received the college award within the last three years.

Nomination Process

The Faculty Personnel Committee (FPC) calls for nominations. Eligible candidates include classified staff and unclassified professionals who do not have teaching responsibilities.

Faculty members, academic professional staff and non-instructional staff members may nominate eligible persons for this award. They need not nominate anyone, they may not nominate themselves, nor may they nominate more than one individual for this award. For each nominee, the person making the nomination should forward a one-page narrative to the chair of the Faculty Personnel Committee, with supporting evidence attached. An award winner will not be eligible for nomination again for 3 years. The chair of the Faculty Personnel Committee will provide the names of ineligible persons in the call for nominations. (To assist the chair, a list of award winners is maintained in the dean’s office.)

All nominations and support documentation are considered active for two years and, excluding award recipients, will be considered by the Faculty Personnel Committee in both years. The Faculty Personnel Committee may request updated documentation from relevant department chairs for nominees in the second year of consideration.

The FPC will review the nominees and select the award winner.

Criteria for Selection

Candidates for the award must:

  1. Be full-time non-instructional staff members in the College for at least one calendar year at the time of the nomination and not have won the award during the last two times it was
  2. Maintain a professional, friendly, let-me-help you atmosphere for all visitors who enter the
  3. Be proactive in helping others (including department head/chair, faculty, staff members, and students).
  4. Work well with other staff and university

2.11 – Practica and Research Activities in Schools

Practica

All teacher education practica and student teaching assignments are arranged by the Coordinator of Placements. See section 4.3 for the Field/Clinical Experience/Internship policy.

Research

After clearance with the WSU Institutional Review Board (IRB), faculty requests to conduct research in the Wichita Public Schools should be submitted to the department head/chair, then to the dean’s office which will forward the request to appropriate USD 259 officials.

Graduate students who wish to conduct research in the schools follow the same procedure except that they must have advisor and department head/chair approval prior to sending the request to the dean’s office.

2.12 – Faculty Travel

University travel policies are detailed in WSU Policies and Procedures section 13.20.

A travel policy is developed by each department's faculty. The policy is maintained by the head/chair after approval by the dean. The department head/chair will distribute, explain, or review the departmental travel policy at the beginning of each academic year. Copies of these policies are available in the departmental offices as well as the dean's office.

Funds assigned to the college expressly for faculty travel are allocated to departments in support of faculty travel associated with formal scholarship expectations. Allocations are made on a per faculty member (pro rata) basis in relation to the available funding pool. For purposes of the allocation, “faculty member” is defined to include (a) any tenured or tenure- eligible faculty member or (b) any unclassified professional who carries a formal scholarship expectation (e.g., 40-40-20) for the ensuing academic year.

Departments set their own policies specifying procedures and eligibility for individual travel awards.

Other funds for travel may be directly assigned to any college unit and are not subject to the distribution formula herein described.

Revised by the LT 8/25/05

2.13 – In-State Travel

  • Before in-state travel is performed, a request must be made to the department head/chair/dean/budget Travel must be approved or reimbursement will not be made. Each department head/chair may have a process for requesting travel. Those persons reporting to the dean may use e-mail.
  • The traveler must use a university car if available unless there are special circumstances.
  • If travel is a “one day” trip, an overnight stay will not be If the traveler stays overnight for convenience, reimbursement will be made as if the travel was completed in one day.

Presented to faculty by LT 2/26/09

2.14 – Advising Students

Advisement of undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in the College of Applied Studies is the shared responsibility of all department faculty. Supervision of advisement policies and procedures is the responsibility of department heads/chairs.

2.15 - Non-Tenure Track Faculty: Time Served Toward Promotion

The CAS complies with WSU Policy 4.27 in regard to eligibility of non-tenure track (NTT) faculty for promotion. In instances when NTT faculty hold appointments of at least 0.50 FTE, but less than 1.0 FTE, the college may base its evaluation of years of credit on FTE level multiplied by years in the role. For example, a 0.50 FTE NTT faculty member working in that role for five years may be credited with 2.5 years of service toward the normal six years at rank. Similarly, the college may base its evaluation of NTT faculty members with discontinuous service at 0.50-1.0 FTE levels on the same formula, summing the periods of service. For example, a NTT faculty member who worked two years at 1.0 FTE, discontinued service for some period of time (e.g., resignation) and then returned to service at the 0.50 FTE level for two years would be credited with three years of service [(2 years X 1.0 FTE) + (2 years X 0.50 FTE).

Approved by CAS Faculty Sept. 13, 2019

Chapter 3 - Programs

3.1 – Course and Program Changes

  1. In line with university policy, changes in courses are initiated by the faculty member in consultation with appropriate the program committee. Changes in program requirements are initiated by program chairs in consultation with their program committees. Unit changes are initiated by the Initial Licensure Teacher Education Program Committee (ILTPC) or the Advanced Program Committee (APC).
  2. Changes in courses must be approved concurrently or before a new program in which they are embedded is considered by any committee.
  3. College Curriculum Change Process

Once a change is initiated, department faculty and/or the department curriculum committee discuss, review and vote. If approved, the proposal moves forward to the department head/chair.

If the department head/chair approves, changes in ILTPC or APC courses or programs are then forwarded to the ILTPC or APC for approval before being sent to the college curriculum committee.

Changes in all other courses or programs that are not involved in the Professional Education Unit are sent directly from the department chair to the college curriculum committee.

If at any point the change is not approved, the form will be returned to the department chair and faculty with comments.

Faculty Member > Department Curriculum Committee > Department Head/Chair > ILTPC or APC (for courses in Professional Education Unit) > College Curricu!lum Committee > Dean

It is the responsibility of the representatives at each level to review recommended changes with other individuals directly concerned before a vote of approval is taken.

3.2 – Program Assessment

In response to accountability-focused accreditation and state and national regulations, the College of Applied Studies establishes that all of its major programs (i.e., those leading to degree, endorsement and/or licensure) are performance-based. In support, the college adopts an assessment system that:

  1. monitors college programs and operations in general,
  2. provides for program-specific assessment plans that monitor student attainment of defined program standards/outcomes and
  3. structures annual review of aggregate student performance data and potential program/unit adjustments in accordance with a uniform set of Core Review Questions.

The college uses technology to support the collection, storage, retrieval and reporting of data for structured reviews and provides an organizational structure and personnel to facilitate the system.

In addition, course syllabi inform students of any required course-embedded assessments and associated rubrics/criteria and of the potential consequences for not passing such assessments.

Chapter 4 - Students

4.1 – Student Concerns

University policy addresses student concerns of various types. Please see the Stucent Concern Process Guide for a resolution guide that references related university policies.

4.2 – Academic Dishonesty

University policy addresses expectations regarding academic honesty and processes related to infractions. Please see WSU Policy 2.17 / Student Academic Integrity for complete information.

4.3 – Field/Clinical Experience/Internship Placement

College of Applied Studies programs require field/clinical experiences or internships that provide opportunities to learn and practice professional skills and apply professional knowledge in practical settings. In the College of Applied Studies, clinical/field experiences/internships are defined by program faculties in consultation/collaboration with practitioners.

For programs that prepare professional educators, clinical/field experience and internship placement policies and procedures are established by the respective program committees in accordance with placement policies established by the Unit's Field Experience Committee. [Note: Field/clinical experience placements are handled centrally for some programs (e.g., initial teacher education) through the Office of CAS Advising Center.]

Clinical/field experience placements policies and procedures for other (i.e., non-school personnel) College of Applied Studies programs are established by the relevant academic department. As a minimum, such department policies and procedures must include the following:

  1. Clinical/field experience requirements must reflect university approved program and course curricula and appear in relevant official program documents provided to candidates (e.g., course syllabus, program handbook).
  2. Placement sites must be approved through mutual agreement between the University and the site agency using an agreement form approved by the College and [Note: The Dean represents the University in formally approving placement site agreements and acts based upon the recommendation of a relevant program faculty representative and department chairs.]

In programs where certain clinical sites require background checks on candidates and/or faculty supervisors prior to placement, the following policies prevail:

  1. Candidates are informed via course syllabi or other unit/program documents that they may be required to undergo background checks in order to participate in required clinical/field experiences/internships at certain clinical sites (e.g., undergraduate/graduate catalog, brochures).
  2. Students and faculty supervisors for which background checks are required must complete those background checks through an agency contracted by the university for that
  3. Departments where background checks are required for certain clinical placements will identify what information in a background check will trigger follow-up action and/or what information is to be shared with clinical

4.4 – College Scholarship Awards

Procedures

  1. Scholarships in the College of Applied Studies will be awarded without regard to age, color, disability, gender, gender expression, gender identity, genetic information, marital status, national origin, political affiliation, pregnancy, race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, or status as a veteran.
  2. Within legal requirements, awards will honor the wishes of donors.
  3. The scholarship coordinator will coordinate the awarding of scholarships by each department by providing each department chair/head a list of the department's scholarships, the amount of each scholarship, the scholarship policies and procedures, and a list of eligible students who have applied.
  4. Each department, either through its chair/head or a faculty selection committee, will work with the scholarship coordinator to select its scholarship recipients.
  5. The department head/chair will review and approve the final selections to be sent to the scholarship coordinator.
  6. The scholarship coordinator will enter the awards in the appropriate university data management system and/or through the appropriate university processes.
  7. No informal written or verbal notifications should be given to applicants prior to official communication from the scholarship coordinator.
  8. The scholarship coordinator will notify scholarship recipients of their awards.
  9. The scholarship coordinator will coordinate communication regarding awards to other appropriate offices on campus, including Strategic Communications.
  10. The scholarship coordinator will maintain a file of names, contact information, and awards given to scholarship recipients.
  11. Selections for scholarships that are not designated for award by any single department will be assigned to the college’s Recruitment and Retention Committee. The same procedures outlined for department awards (see items 3-8) will be followed with the assistant and associate deans serving as the final reviewer/approver.

The scholarship coordinator will administer renewals for students who continue to meet their respective scholarship’s requirements. Scholarship renewals are not subject to additional department or college review.

Chapter 5 - Technology

5.1 –Provision of Technology to Faculty

When resources allow, the dean’s office will supply each full-time faculty and staff member with a computer for professional use. Faculty and staff will be able to choose between two base model options—one a Macintosh platform, the other PC. Costs associated with upgrades beyond the base models and additional equipment (e.g., external monitor) will be incurred by departments and must be approved in advance by the appropriate department head/chair. The dean’s office will consider requests for replacement computers, assuming available funds. However, any funding provided by the dean’s office for a replacement computer will be contingent on an evaluation by the technology staff of the faculty or staff member’s current computer and its performance level. Whenever possible, the preferred option will be to maintain current computers to insure acceptable performance for extended life spans. There is no timetable for replacing faculty and staff computers on an interval basis.

5.2 –Inventory

The college’s technology staff will maintain inventory of all college-owned or department-owned hardware and software, in compliance with university procedures. All college or department purchases of hardware or software must be reported to the technology staff to insure that complete records are entered and maintained.

5.3 –Applied Learning Center: Class Meetings

The college’s Applied Learning Center is available to host class meetings on a limited basis. Requests for reservations should be submitted via the university’s technology support system at least 48 hours in advance of meeting time. Reservations are granted on a first-come, first-served basis. When classes do meet in the ALC, the course instructor is expected to be present through the class meeting.

5.4 – College Technology: Equipment Checkout

Eligibility

  1. Equipment may only be checkout by currently enrolled WSU students or currently employed WSU faculty, staff, or unclassified professional. They must be in good standing with no outstanding lost charges or blocks on their record.
  2. Equipment may only be checked out after eligible patrons present a current Shocker Card.
  3. All internet and computer activities must comply with WSU’s Acceptable Use Policy and student Code of Conduct. Violations of these policies will be reported to the appropriate university officials.

Liability and Fines

  1. Equipment must be checked in on the last day of final exams to prevent late fees. Fines accrue at a rate of $10 per hour, not to exceed $120 maximum fines plus an additional $15 processing fee.
  2. If equipment is not returned the last day of final exams, it will be declared lost. A replacement charge based on replacement costs and not to exceed $650 will be assessed to the patron’s account until the equipment is returned. Once retuned, as long as there is no damage to the equipment, the fee will be reduced to the $10 per hour fine, not to exceed the $120 maximum overdue fine. Failure to return equipment during the next business day will result in an assessment of the maximum fine plus an additional $15 processing fees.
  3. Once equipment is considered lost, attempts will be made to contact the patron to recover the equipment. If the patron cannot be contacted or refuses to return the equipment, the WSU College of Applied Studies dean’s office reserves the right to turn the account over to the WSU Police for possible prosecution.
  4. Patrons are fully responsible for the equipment in their care from the time of checkout until check in occurs, including any damages or theft.
  5. Damage charges will be based on the replacement value of the equipment including peripherals damaged. Charges will be placed on the patron’s university account and collected through the same process used for other university charges.
  6. Patrons are cautioned to never leave the equipment unattended as they are responsible for any lost charges resulting from neglect or theft. If a theft occurs, the patron should contact the Technology Center immediately. The Technology Center will contact the WSU police Department.
  7. Any problem with the equipment should be reported immediately to the Technology Lab.
  8. WSU College of Applied Studies accepts no responsibility for files lost or damaged while using the equipment.
  9. Abuse of any aspects of this policy by a patron will result in the loss of equipment privileges by that patron.

5.5 – College Equipment: Software

Faculty requests for specialized software to be placed on college-owned hardware (e.g., lab computers) must be submitted via the university’s technology help ticketing system. College technology staff members, in consultation with the dean’s office, will review each request, assess any costs involved and whether adequate resources are available to cover those costs, and evaluate the technical support needs related to the software. Based on this review, requests may or may not be supported.

5.6 – Technology Staff: Personal Equipment

College technology staff members are prohibited from working on any student’s or faculty or staff member’s personally-owned computer or other equipment. Staff members may provide guidance as faculty or staff members configure their mobile devices to receive university email.

5.7 – Applied Learning Center: Printers and 3D Printers

WSU uses a printing tool called PaperCut to handle paper print jobs on campus. Computers in the CAS Technology Center employ this system, and the price to print is 10¢ per page. The technology staff cannot grant exceptions to students, faculty or staff members wanting to print on lab computers without using the PaperCut system.

The Applied Learning Center’s 3D printers are available to students, faculty and staff. However, given the complexities of completing 3D printing projects, 3D printing requests must be submitted to a technology staff member who will complete the printing process. The requestor must provide the technology staff member with full details about the project, including the print file in a format compatible with the 3D printer. Upon receipt of the project information, the technology staff member will then provide pricing information to the requestor. Once the requestor agrees to the charge, the project will be scheduled for printing at the earliest available opportunity.

5.8 – Applied Learning Center: Decorum

Students, faculty and staff members working in the college’s Applied Learning Center or interacting with technology staff members on technical support matters are expected to exhibit appropriate, professional behavior, as defined in WSU Policies and Procedures and the Faculty Handbook, at all times. Failure to uphold such expectations may result in suspension of Applied Learning Center access and equipment checkout privileges, as well as additional consequences that may be determined through university reporting mechanisms.

5.9 – Redeployment of College Equipment/Technology

In the event that technology in the College of Applied Studies becomes available for redeployment, the College of Applied Studies Leadership Team has adopted the following operational procedures to assist in the cascading of used technology.

  1. Determine the primary (>50%) source of funding or donation source for the technology. This can usually be determined by identifying the unit on whose equipment inventory the technology is listed.
  2. Department-Funded: If a department is the primary source of funding through its restricted use (RU) or endowment accounts, the department may cascade the technology internally according to a departmentally adopted plan which should be on file in the department and the dean’s office. If the department does not wish to cascade the technology internally, it will then be considered College funded technology and will be cascaded according to the procedure described below under College Funded.
  3. Grant Funded: If a grant is the source of technology funding, the Principal Investigator’s (PI’s or First PI’s) department will be considered the primary funding source and cascading will proceed according to the appropriate departmentally developed plan. If the grant is produced from the Dean’s office, the technology is considered College Funded and will be cascaded according to the procedure described below.
  4. Donation or Cascade From Other University Unit: If a department (or the dean’s office) received technology as a donation of new equipment, or as a result of cascading from other campus units, the technology will be considered funded by the receiving unit and will be cascaded/redeployed accordingly,
  5. If the technology is considered to be College funded, it will be cascaded as specified by the dean’s office in consultation with the technology staff. Considerations will include relevant requests that may have been submitted by departments, any costs that be incurred in optimizing equipment for redeployment, and the college’ strategic priorities.
  6. If the dean’s office, in consultation with the technology staff, cannot identify potential benefit from redeploying or keeping the technology item, it will be identified as surplus and sent to the University Physical Plant Warehouse.
  7. Except in exceptional circumstances (requiring the Dean’s approval), college units will not engage in the “sale” of technology items to other units either within the college or to other units on campus.

Technology is broadly defined. It encompasses both hardware and software and includes such items as computers, projectors, fax machines, scanners, monitors, video/digital cameras, etc.

“Department” is broadly defined and includes, but is not limited to, other subunits such as CAS Advising Center, the Center for Physical Activity and Aging, and the Play Therapy Center.

Chapter 6 - Miscellaneous

6.1 – Annual Fund Campaign

  1. Funds solicited in the Annual Campaign will be primarily sought to support the College of Applied Studies Fund for Excellence (i.e., funds for promoting excellence in the College of Applied Studies). Although donations made by alumni from a particular department will be noted, the primary "ask" will focus on the college.

  2. Proceeds derived by the College from the Annual Campaign will be distributed 30% to the Dean’s Office with the remaining 70% divided proportionately to the number of department teaching faculty and unclassified professionals.

  3. While departments may utilize their Annual Campaign in numerous ways, they are expected to devote at least 51% of their allocation to uses that directly benefit students.

Approved for implementation by the Leadership Team on 9/2/97
Revised 10/6/05, 8/20/15

6.2 – Course Instructional Fees

When course instructional fees are distributed to the college, the dean’s office will retain 20% of those net proceeds received from Academic Affairs. The remaining balance will be allocated to the college’s academic departments based on the credit hours generated by each class and the related instructional fee per credit hour .

Revised effective Fall 2021 semester

6.3 – Enrollment Minimums

The College of Applied Studies does not have absolute minimum initial enrollments in courses for them to continue to be offered. It is acknowledged that this is a complex decision involving consideration of the type of course, its status as a requirement in a program and relation to students' timely progress through a program, and the like. Nevertheless, there are target minimums to provide guidance in making such decisions.

For non-practicum/internship/clinical courses, these minimums apply:

  • 15 in upper division courses & workshops

  • 8 in master’s degree courses

  • 5 in doctoral courses

For practicum/clinical courses, each discipline will establish a reasonable enrollment minimum in relation to any faculty load assigned for supervision.

In cohort programs, the numbers of students admitted should take into consideration expected enrollment mortality over the life of the program cycle.

Approved for implementation by the Leadership Team on 8/13/98
Revised 12/1/16

6.4 – Special Events

When planning for a conference to be hosted at Wichita State, faculty and staff should work in concert with Office for Workforce, Professional and Community Education.

The policy that follows is designated for an event that specifically requires approval from the College of Applied Studies.

An event is defined as a planned occurrence sanctioned by the college or one of its departments or programs that involves university/unit personnel, and/or the use of facilities and/or resources. Proposals for events may be submitted by College of Applied Studies faculty or staff members. An event must be aligned with the College of Applied Studies mission.

All requests for event approval must adhere to the following process:

  1. Submit a request for approval to plan an event prior to making any commitment for the department, CAS, or university to the department chair/head or supervisor. The department chair/head or supervisor insures that the request is in alignment with the College of Applied Studies mission. The department chairperson or supervisor will approve initial planning processes.

  2. A detailed event plan will be submitted to the department chair/head or It will contain (a) a detailed description of the event, (b) description of those attending, (c) expected outcomes of the event, (d) a detailed budget, (e) contingency plans in case of deficit, and (f) a detailed description of how profits, if any, should be/would be dispersed. The description must include the anticipated amount of support staff services, CAS and/or technical support services, and other university resources.

  3. The department chair/head will bring the event request to the department faculty for The event request approval must be approved by a majority of the department faculty to move forward. If approved at the department level, the department must indicate it has contingency funds to support the event in case of an event deficit. If approved by department faculty, the department chair/head will review and make a recommendation for or against approval with rationale to the dean. In the case of an event being proposed by a staff member, the proposal will be reviewed by the supervisor. If approved, it will be sent to the dean, and if the dean deems necessary, the College of Applied Studies Leadership Team for a final decision. The final decision for approval of the event will be made by the dean.