Overview

Dr. Breanna Boppre is an Assistant Professor (tenure-track) in the School of Criminal Justice. She earned her Ph.D. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2018. She was honored as an Outstanding Graduate from her university. Dr. Boppre also earned her M.S. in Criminal Justice from Portland State University and her B.A.(hon) in Criminal Justice from the University of Nevada, Reno.

Dr. Boppre’s research investigates how gender and race shape criminal justice processes with a focus on correctional policies. She uses various methodological techniques, including quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods. Her work appears in numerous peer reviewed outlets including the International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative CriminologyCorrections: Policy, Practice, and Research, and Victims & Offenders

Dr. Boppre has been involved with several externally and internally funded research projects. Dr. Boppre conducts research with multiple agencies in the community. She helps agencies implement and evaluate evidence-based practices with an emphasis on gender-responsive strategies.  

Dr. Boppre currently teaches Corrections, Introduction to Research Methods, and Women, Crime, and Criminal Justice. She uses engaging teaching techniques (e.g., experiential and service learning) to help students build personal and applied connections to the course material. Dr. Boppre prioritizes diversity and inclusion in her research and teaching. She was recently named a Tilford Fellow for Wichita State to further develop diversity-related coursework in the School of Criminal Justice.

Information

Academic Interests and Expertise
  • Women's system-involvement
  • Correctional policies and practices
  • Gender and diversity
  • Mixed methods
  • Community engaged research
Publications

Peer Reviewed Journal Articles

1. Boppre, B., & Boyer, C. (In press). “The Traps Started during my Childhood”: The Role of Substance Abuse in Women’s Responses to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma, Special Issue on the Abuse-to-Prison Pipeline. Accepted 7-28-2019.

2. Boppre, B., Miethe, T. D., Troshynski, E. I., & Salisbury, E. J. (In press). Cross-National Differences in Women’s Imprisonment Rates: Exploring the Conditional Effects of Gender Inequality and Other Macro-Level Factors. International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice. Accepted 9-29-2019. 

3. Belisle, L., Boppre, B., Keen, J., & Salisbury, E.J. (In press). Bringing Course Material to Life Through Experiential Learning: Impacts on Students’ Learning and Perceptions in a Corrections Course. Journal of Criminal Justice Education.

4. Boppre, B. (2019). Improving Correctional Strategies for Women at the Margins: Recommendations for an Intersectionally-Responsive Approach. Corrections: Policy, Practice, and Research, 4, 195-221.

5. Salisbury, E. J., Sundt, J., & Boppre, B. (2019). Mapping the Implementation Landscape: Assessing the Systematic Capacity of Statewide Community Corrections Agencies to Deliver Evidence-Based Practices. Corrections: Policy, Practice, and Research Special Issue on Community Corrections, 4, 19-38.

6. Boppre, B., Sundt, J., & Salisbury, E. J. (2018). The Limitations and Strengths of the Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS) as a Measure of Correctional Employees’ Attitudes: A Psychometric Evaluation. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 62, 3947-3964.

7. Salisbury, E. J., Kalantry, S., Boppre, B., Brundige, E., & Martínez, S. (2018). Expanding the Feminist Pathways Perspective Beyond the United States: A Profile of Federal Women Prisoners in Argentina. Women & Criminal Justice, 28, 125-151.

8. Boppre, B., & Harmon, M. G. (2017). The Unintended Consequences of Sentencing Reforms: Using Social Chain Theory to Examine Racial Disparities in Female Imprisonment. The Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice, 15, 394-423.

9. Harmon, M. G., & Boppre, B. (2016). Women of Color and the War on Crime: An Explanation for the Rise in Female Black Imprisonment. The Journal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice, 16, 1-24.

10. Boppre, B., & Miller, M. K. (2014). How Victim and Execution Impact Statements Affect Mock Jurors’ Perceptions, Emotions, and Verdicts. Victims & Offenders, 9, 413-435.

Commentary

Salisbury, E. J., Sundt, J., & Boppre, B. (2019). Guest Editors’ Comments: Risk Assessment and Judicial Decision Making. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 46, 181-184.

Selected Chapters and Encyclopedia Entries

Boppre, B. (In press). Intersectionality in Correctional Contexts: Implications for Women under Correctional Supervision. In C. M. Coates & M. Walker-Pickett, (Eds.), Women and Minorities in Criminal Justice: An Intersectionality Approach. Dubuque, IA: Kendall Hunt.

Reed, S., & Boppre, B. (In press). Considering Boys and Men in the Feminist Pathways Perspective. In L. Carter, C. Blankenship, and C. Marcum (Eds.), Punishing Gender Past and Present: Examining the Criminal Justice System Across Gendered Experiences. San Diego, CA: Cognella.

Boppre, B., Salisbury, E. J., & Parker, J. (2018). Pathways to Crime. In H. Pontell and K. Holtfreter (Eds.), Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Salisbury, E. J., Boppre, B., & Kelly, B. (2016). Gender-Responsive Risk and Need Assessment: Implications for the Treatment of Justice-Involved Women. In F. Taxman (Ed.), Division on Corrections and Sentencing, Volume 1, Handbook on Risk and Need Assessment: Theory and Practice (p. 220-243). London: Taylor and Francis/Routledge.

Awards and Honors

2019  University Research/Creative Project Award, Wichita State University

2019   Service-Learning Faculty Scholar, Wichita State University

2019   Tilford Diversity Fellowship, Wichita State University

2019   Multidisciplinary Research Project Award, Wichita State University

2018   Outstanding Graduate, President Len Jessup, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2018   President's Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2016   Graduate Student Paper Award, American Society of Criminology, Division on Women and Crime