Dec. 1, 2020 — Wichita State University has created a scholarship and support network to help those nearest to its campus. The Shocker Neighborhood Commitment provides funding to make college more affordable and attainable for recent high school graduates living in the Shocker Neighborhood.

Nov. 17, 2020 – Kylie Cameron chose to attend Wichita State after learning about the abundance of opportunities offered. While pursuing degrees in journalism and political science, Kylie was involved in The Sunflower student newspaper and the Dorothy and Bill Cohen Honors College. Kylie is one of more than 1,200 students eligible for fall 2020 graduation. Learn more about her time at Wichita State, and read some advice she has for current students.

November 16, 2020 - Kirsten Long, from Haven, came to Wichita State University to start her career in education. She credits her field experiences and helpful teachers with preparing her for teaching. Kirsten is one of more than 1,200 students eligible for fall 2020 graduation. Learn more about her time at Wichita State and what is next for the grad.

Nov. 16, 2020 — Both Samuel Pittman’s parents work at Wichita State University, so he spent a good amount of time on campus as a child. But what really drew him to become a Shocker was the university’s strong sport management program.

Nov. 16, 2020 – Since kindergarten, Jenna Maxwell knew she wanted to be an elementary school teacher and decided to attend Wichita State for its teaching program. Jenna is one of more than 1,200 students eligible for fall 2020 graduation.

Nov. 10, 2020 — Incoming freshmen and transfer students have an opportunity to receive up to $20,000 as part of Wichita State University’s new Shocker Adelante Scholarship.

Nov. 3, 2020 — Lily Guillen, a graduate student in studio art, is one of thousands of first-generation students at Wichita State University. She will be taking over the university’s Instagram account on Wednesday, Nov. 4, to share her experiences as a first-gen student.

Oct. 30. 2020 — A team of interdisciplinary researchers at Wichita State University is using artificial intelligence and big data to digitally transform the way communities predict and respond to natural disasters.

There are several artists with Wichita State University connections involved in the public art projects in and around the Riverfront Stadium, home of the Wichita Wind Surge minor-league professional team. Several of the public art projects are visible outside the stadium and more are scheduled for installation in the coming months. All of the artists are local or regional.

Oct. 16, 2020 — The Center for Educational Technologies to Assist Refugee Learners is working to improve the lives of more than 70 million forcibly displaced refugees worldwide by making education more accessible.

Oct. 9, 2020 — Thousands of school principals are faced with a challenge no other living school leader has faced: leading their schools through a pandemic. We're featuring two principals with roots in Shocker Nation.

Sept. 23, 2020 - Darren Defrain is the social professor of English and director of the writing program at Wichita State. Defrain has written novels, memoirs and essays, created a graphic novel, teaches on graphic novels/storytelling and is actively working on a graphic novel app.

Sept. 21, 2020 — A panelist of performing artists, moderated by Rodney Miller, dean of the College of Fine Arts, will discuss the disproportionate effect of COVID-19 on the events industry at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 23.

Sept. 18, 2020 - In July, Emily Christensen spent five days on Zoom participating in the National Critics Institute, a program of the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center in Waterford, Conn. Christensen, coordinator of external affairs for Wichita State University’s School of Art, Design and Creative Industries, wrote about food, plays, movies and dance. She, and 16 others in her group, listened to and received critiques from people such as such as Chicago Tribune theater critic Chris Jones, who directs the program, and Helen Shaw of New York Magazine.

Aug. 31, 2020 -- Gene and Yolanda Camarena are well known for helping underserved Kansas youth improve their lives through education and other causes. Now the Wichita couple is enhancing that legacy with a $1 million gift to Wichita State University to give students of color opportunities they otherwise might not have.