Fiske w Miro

What We're Teaching Summer 2022 and Fall 2022

 This Summer and Fall, courses will be offered in a variety of formats - in-person, hybrid, as well as online.  Please ask your professor for details, as course formats may vary from instructor to instructor. 

Courses numbered 100 to 299 = lower-division; 300 to 499 = upper-division; 500 to 799 = undergraduate/graduate. To register for a course, or just to get the dates and times, visit the WSU Schedule of Courses (more useful links are provided ad the bottom of this page).

Click here to jump to Summer 2022 courses (all levels).

Click here to jump to Fall 2022 introductory courses.

Click here to jump to Fall 2022 First Year Seminars.

Click here to jump to Fall 2022 upper division courses.

 

 


Summer 2022 Courses

PHIL 105.  Critical Reasoning (3).

General education humanities course. Helps students become better at reasoning. Focuses on different patterns of reasoning common in college-level studies and in everyday life. Some patterns are treated in concrete and content-specific ways, and others are treated in highly abstract ways. Students also learn to be critical by different kinds of standards. For example, students learn about how much precision to demand when reasoning about different kinds of topics, and how to evaluate considerations in terms of relevance. Ultimately, students learn how to strengthen their own capacities for reasoning and how to recognize and correct errors in their own thinking and in other people's reasoning.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Rebecca Fensholt. CRN: 31020

PHIL 306 Business Ethics (3).

General education humanities course. A critical examination of representative moral issues that arise in the context of business. Focuses on topics such as the nature of professionalism, the social responsibility of business, regulation, employee rights and obligations, sexual harassment, economic justice, environmental impact, the limits of property rights, and conflicting international mores and practices. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 105 with a grade of C or better.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Anastasia Pine. CRN: 31329.

PHIL 327.  Bioethics (3).

General education humanities course. Examines ethical issues related to health care such as truth-telling to patients, confidentiality, euthanasia, abortion, prenatal obligations and distribution of health care. Course includes diversity content.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Angela Sager. CRN: 31022.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Angela Sager. CRN: 31031.

PHIL 385.  Engineering Ethics (3).

General education humanities course. Examines representative ethical issues that arise in engineering. Topics include: professional responsibility and integrity, whistle-blowing, conflict of interest, ethical issues in engineering consulting and research, engineering and environmental issues, and engineering in a global context. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Brian Hepburn. CRN: 31332.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Brian Hepburn. CRN: 31408.

Fall 2022 Introductory Courses

PHIL 100.  Introduction to Philosophy (3).

General education humanities course. Exploration of the meaning of philosophic activity through an examination of several basic interpretations of the distinguishing intentions, characteristic procedures and essential functions of the philosophic endeavor. Introduces some of the fundamental problems and possible values of philosophy. Develops a broad understanding of the meaning of philosophy as a diverse and self-critical historical enterprise.

  • HYBRID TR 5:35pm-6:50pm. Susan Sterrett. CRN: 17322. (Main Campus) New!
  • HYBRID W 7:05pm-9:45pm. Paticia Morriss. CRN: 13843.(WSU South Campus)

PHIL 105.  Critical Reasoning (3).

General education humanities course. Helps students become better at reasoning. Focuses on different patterns of reasoning common in college-level studies and in everyday life. Some patterns are treated in concrete and content-specific ways, and others are treated in highly abstract ways. Students also learn to be critical by different kinds of standards. For example, students learn about how much precision to demand when reasoning about different kinds of topics, and how to evaluate considerations in terms of relevance. Ultimately, students learn how to strengthen their own capacities for reasoning and how to recognize and correct errors in their own thinking and in other people's reasoning.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Rebecca Fensholt. CRN: 13845.
  • HYBRID MW 9:30am-10:45am. Xiufen Liu. CRN: 15830.
  • HYBRID MW 11:00am-12:15pm. Xiufen Liu. CRN: 15830.

PHIL 125.  Introductory Logic (3).

General education humanities course. Deals with the uses of logical concepts and techniques to evaluate and criticize reasoning. Studies some elementary systems of formal logic. Arguments evaluated are drawn from such diverse fields as law, science, politics, religion and advertising.

  • In person MW 9:30am-10:45 am. Brian Hepburn. CRN: 13849. 
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Angela Sager. CRN: 16900.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Angela Sager. CRN: 16901.

PHIL 228 Introduction to Japanese Philosophy (3). New!

General education humanities course. A survey of Japanese philosophy that selects topics and relevant figures from the ancient period (roughly the late sixth century CE) to the present day. Examines the emergence of Japanese philosophical contributions from philosophical movements like Buddhism (especially Zen and Pure Land Buddhism), Confucianism, and Shintoism prior to the Meiji Restoration in 1868 and the appropriation and critique of Western philosophy in the post-Meiji era. Topics may include the nature of reality, aesthetics, the “bodymind,” ethics, impermanence and the significance of death, the insubstantial self, questions about meaning, environmental philosophy, and philosophy of technology.

  • HYB Meets in person Tuesdays 4:30-5:45pm at WSU South. Angela Sager. CRN: 17252

Counts towards all of these!

  • World Philosophy Concentration
  • Asian Studies Certificate
  • Japanese Minor
  • International Studies Major

Fall 2022 First Year Seminars

FYPL 102A FYS: Law (3).

This course is a first-year seminar on law in which we will take a broad interdisciplinary approach to US law.  Domains of law such as constitutional law, tort law, and criminal law will be introduced.  Covers legal procedures, argumentation and reasoning.  Cases and current events will be used to illustrate basic concepts and raise philosophical issues.  International law and comparison with other legal systems may be used provide context and perspective.  This course contains diversity content.

  • In person MW 11:00am-12:15pm. Jeffrey Hershfield. CRN: 16501.

FYPL 102B FYS: Critical Reasoning about Weird Things (3). New!

This course is a first year seminar on critical reasoning, in which students focus on learning and practicing the tools required to understand and critically evaluate weird and extraordinary claims. Students work on understanding how arguments work, how to reconstruct them, and how to critically reason about both everyday arguments and arguments about unusual or extraordinary topics, such as pseudoscientific claims about the paranormal, miracle drugs and conspiracy theories. 

  • In person MW 12:30pm-1:45pm. Patrick Bondy.  CRN: 17277  
  • In person MW 14:00am-15:15pm. Patrick Bondy. CRN: 17275

Fall 2022 Upper Division Courses

PHIL 306 Business Ethics (3).

General education humanities course. A critical examination of representative moral issues that arise in the context of business. Focuses on topics such as the nature of professionalism, the social responsibility of business, regulation, employee rights and obligations, sexual harassment, economic justice, environmental impact, the limits of property rights, and conflicting international mores and practices. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 105 with a grade of C or better.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Anastasia Pine. CRN: 13851.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Anastasia Pine. CRN: 13852.

PHIL 320. Philosophy of Science (3).

General education humanities course. A study of the methods, goals, and world views of the sciences with attention to such topics as the structure and evaluation of scientific theories, the nature of explanation, the dynamics of scientific revolutions and the impact of science on human society and values.

  • HYBRID TR 2:00pm-3:15pm. Susan Sterrett. CRN: 15450.

PHIL 322. Early Modern Philosophy (3).

General education humanities course. A study of philosophical thought in the period from the Renaissance through the 17th century with selections from philosophers such as Pico, Vico, Galileo, Cusanus, Telesio, Erasmus, More, Hobbes, Bacon, Machiavelli, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Malebranche, and Locke.

  • In person MW 11:00am-12:15pm. Brian Hepburn. CRN: 16504.

PHIL 325. Formal Logic (3).

Studies systems of formal logic including sentential and predicate logic. Emphasizes the uses of these systems in the analysis of arguments. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 125 Introduction to Logic.

  • In person TR 12:30pm-1:45pm. James Schwartz. CRN: 16507.

PHIL 327.  Bioethics (3).

General education humanities course. Examines ethical issues related to health care such as truth-telling to patients, confidentiality, euthanasia, abortion, prenatal obligations and distribution of health care. Course includes diversity content.

  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Angela Sager. CRN: 13853.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Jeremy Gallegos. CRN: 13854.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Jeremy Gallegos. CRN: 15849.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Jeremy Gallegos. CRN: 16350.

PHIL 342.  History of Ethics (3).

General education humanities course. Examines the development of ethics from its ancient Greek origins to the present, or focuses on the ethics of an important historical period such as the modern period. Highlights the substantive and methodological shifts, as well as the historical, social and philosophical pressures that make such shifts explicable. Engages such historically influential philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Hume, Kant, Mill and Nietzsche. Prerequisite(s): PHIL 100, 125, or 144.

  • HYBRID TR 12:30-1:45pm. Xiufen Lu. CRN: 16505. Counts towards World Philososophy Concentration, Ethics Concentration, Pre-Law Concentration, and Asian Studies Certificate.

PHIL 354.  Ethics and Computers (3).

General education humanities course. Ethics with application to the ethical issues which may arise from the use of computers, including the moral responsibility of computer professionals for the effect their work has on persons and society; the moral obligations of a computer professional to clients, employer and society; the conceptual and ethical issues surrounding the control and ownership of software; and the justifiability of regulation of the design, use and marketing of computer technology. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite(s): junior standing or departmental consent.

  • HYBRID ONLINE. Day Radebaugh. CRN: 15209.
  • HYBRID ONLINE. Day Radebaugh. CRN: 15833.

PHIL 385.  Engineering Ethics (3).

General education humanities course. Examines representative ethical issues that arise in engineering. Topics include: professional responsibility and integrity, whistle-blowing, conflict of interest, ethical issues in engineering consulting and research, engineering and environmental issues, and engineering in a global context. Course includes diversity content. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

  • In person MW 11:00am-12:15pm. James Schwartz. CRN: 13855. 
  • In person MW 12:30pm-1:45pm. James Schwartz. CRN: 15851.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Brian Hepburn. CRN: 13862. 
  • HYBRID ONLINE. Day Radebaugh. CRN: 15515.
  • ONLINE Asynchronous. Jason Matteson. CRN: 14620.

PHIL 526.  Ethics of Big Data  (3). New!

General education humanities course. When we aim to collect and transform data into insight for better decisions, ethical values determine the core of what counts as better. Unintended consequences and systemic biases often misdirect the outcomes. This course examines ethical issues that have arisen or that may be expected to arise in the development and use of big data, data analytics, apps, automated personal assistants and smart technology. Topics may include privacy and transparency, pitfalls of personalized automation in medicine, alternatives to contracts of adhesion, identification and prediction in law enforcement and security, smartening agriculture, hardening social media against disinformation, and algorithmic oppression. Focuses on prevention and problem-solving for future professionals and anyone interested in data science, analytics, algorithm development and smart technology. May be tailored to address current events and student interest. Course includes diversity content. 

  • HYBRID Synchronous TR 2:00-3:15pm. Susan Castro. CRN: 16500.

PHIL 550.  Metaphysics (3).

An exploration of some basic topics in the theory of reality. Includes such notions as space, time, substance, causality, particulars, universals, appearance, essence and being. Prerequisite(s): one course in philosophy

  • In person TR 9:30am-10:45am. Patrick Bondy. CRN: 16506.

PHIL 555.  Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3).

Studies such topics as the relations of social science with natural science and philosophy, methodological problems peculiar to social science, the nature of sound explanation concepts and constructs and the roles of mathematics and formal theories in social science.

  • In person TR 11:00am-12:15pm. Robert Feleppa. CRN: 16508.

PHIL 590O.  Models and Analogies (3).

In this small seminar-style course, students look at the history and philosophy of the use of models and analogies in various sciences, up to and including the present day. Includes mathematical models as well as physical models, and includes not only physics, chemistry and biology, but social sciences, such as political science, economics and psychology. In the first part of the course, students read and discuss philosophical works about how models and analogies are involved in science, sometimes implicitly, and consider how it is that they can often extend knowledge and understanding, yet also how they can sometimes mislead. In the second part of the course, students take an in-depth look at examples of the use of models in various fields; the choice of topics are based on student interest.

  • HYBRID Synchronous MW 2:00pm-3:15pm. Susan Sterrett. CRN: 16503.