Below you will find information about undergraduate and graduate courses with space exploration content, space-related fellowship opportunities, and space-related scholarship opportunities.

Undegraduate Courses about Space Exploration at Wichita State

AE 415: Introduction to Space Dynamics (3 credits)

Fundamentals of orbital mechanics and rigid body dynamics, two-body problems, orbital maneuvers and orbital determination, rigid body kinematics, and kinetics. Prerequisites: AE 227 and AE 373 (no grade lower than one that generates 2.000 or more credit points per credit hour will be accepted for AE 373). Corequisite: MATH 555. 

AE 502: Aerospace Propulsion I (3 credits)

Survey of aerospace propulsion methods. Production of thrust and consumption of fuel. Rocket performance analysis; liquid chemical and solid propellant rocket engines. Jet engine cycle analysis; turbojet, ramjet, turbofan and turboprop engines. Analysis of piston engines and propellers. Prerequisites: AE 227, 373, ME 398. Corequisite: AE 424.

AE 702: Aerospace Propulsion II (3 credits)

In-depth study of rocket and jet propulsion. Turbojet and rocket engine components. Effect of operating variables on turbojet cycles and rocket performance. Prerequisite: AE 502 or instructor's consent.

AE 715: Intermediate Space Dynamics (3 credits)

Advanced topics in orbital mechanics-vector mechanics perspective of the two-body problem; fast transfers; interplanetary missions including gravity assist maneuver and intercept problem; atmospheric entry. Prerequisite: AE 415 or instructor's consent. 

AE 760 AC: Nano-satellite Engineering (3 credits)

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the design of a nano-satellite and mission design catering to given mission requirements. Specific topics covered in this course include nano-satellite mission analysis, attitude control, electrical power systems, propulsion subsystem, thermal system, telemetry, data handling/processing and systems engineering tests. The course includes hands-on experimentation utilizing nano-satellite educational kits.

BME 722: Introduction to Biorobotics (3 credits)

Biorobotics combines human anatomy and physiology, electronics, mechanics and robotics technology using computer programming. It is being investigated for use in prosthetics, surgical and therapeutic devices. Course includes robotic principles, theories and control strategies used to manipulate various robotics devices through human physiological signals in real time. Covers topics on robotics in BME, prosthetics, biosignal processing, microcontroller programming, human sense of touch and virtual world communication. Fundamental knowledge of bioinstrumentation, rehabilitation, robotics and signal processing is demonstrated in the laboratory to create a human-machine-computer interface. Students gain hands-on experience with sensors, microcontrollers, actuators, haptic controllers, robotic arm, prosthetic hand and various MATLAB/Simulink toolboxes in order to implement biorobotics algorithms into 3D simulation and stationary/automobile robotic devices. Prerequisite: BME 480 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 302: Earth & Space Sciences (3 credits)

2 Classroom hours; 2 Lab hours. General education advanced further study course. A general survey of the physical environment, including elements of geology, geography, meteorology, climatology, oceanography and astronomy. May require field trips.

GEOL 795: Earth and Space Physics (3 credits)

Cross-listed as PHYS 795. An introduction to the geosciences and astrophysics of the solar system. Topics include the surface, interior and atmospheres of the planets with a comparative planetology approach, and the sun-planet system including solar physics and the effect of the sun on the earth's environment and geologic history. Prerequisites: PHYS 313-314, and MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructor's consent. 

PHYS 195: Introduction to Modern Astronomy (3 credits)

General education introductory course. A survey of astronomy for the student with little or no background in science or math. The nature and evolution of the universe and objects in it are considered from the perspective of the question: Why do things happen the way they do? May include comparison of the planets, stars and black holes, galaxies and quasars, and the expansion of the universe. 

PHYS 196: Laboratory in Modern Astronomy (1 credit)

3 Lab hours. The application of the techniques and analysis of the data of modern astronomy. For the student with some background in the physical sciences. When PHYS 196 is completed, 195 and 196 count as a laboratory science. Requires field trips. Prerequisites: two semesters of high school algebra or the equivalent, or instructor's consent, and PHYS 195, which may be taken concurrently. 

PHYS 395: Solar System Astronomy (3 credits)

General education advanced further study course. Studies the sun, major planets and minor bodies of the solar system, particularly their nature and origin. Discusses classical ground-based observations and the results of satellite investigations. Primarily for students with little prior contact with science. 

PHYS 595: Astrophysics (3 credits)

Covers the formation, life and death of stars. Topics include: HR-diagrams, atomic and molecular spectra, radiative and convective transfer, the structure and spectra of stellar atmospheres, and stellar evolution. Prerequisite: PHYS 551.

PHYS 701F: Astrophysics II (3 credits)

Continuation of PHYS 595. Covers the properties of the solar system and extra-solar planets. Other topics of modern astronomy are included such as the formation of galaxies, cosmology and the Big Bang model. Prerequisite: PHYS 595 or instructor’s consent.

PHYS 795: Earth and Space Physics (3 credits)

Cross-listed as GEOL 795. An introduction to the geosciences and astrophysics of the solar system. Topics include the surface, interior and atmospheres of the planets with a comparative planetology approach, and the sun-planet system including solar physics and the effect of the sun on the earth's environment and geologic history. Prerequisites: PHYS 313-314, and MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructor's consent. 

 

Graduate Courses about Space Exploration at Wichita State
 

AE 502: Aerospace Propulsion I (3 credits)

Survey of aerospace propulsion methods. Production of thrust and consumption of fuel. Rocket performance analysis; liquid chemical and solid propellant rocket engines. Jet engine cycle analysis; turbojet, ramjet, turbofan and turboprop engines. Analysis of piston engines and propellers. Prerequisites: AE 227, 373, ME 398. Corequisite: AE 424.

AE 702: Aerospace Propulsion II (3 credits)

In-depth study of rocket and jet propulsion. Turbojet and rocket engine components. Effect of operating variables on turbojet cycles and rocket performance. Prerequisite: AE 502 or instructor's consent.

AE 715: Intermediate Space Dynamics (3 credits)

Advanced topics in orbital mechanics-vector mechanics perspective of the two-body problem; fast transfers; interplanetary missions including gravity assist maneuver and intercept problem; atmospheric entry. Prerequisite: AE 415 or instructor's consent. 

AE 760AC: Nano-satellite Engineering (3 credits)

This course provides a fundamental understanding of the design of a nano-satellite and mission design catering to given mission requirements. Specific topics covered in this course include nano-satellite mission analysis, attitude control, electrical power systems, propulsion subsystem, thermal system, telemetry, data handling/processing and systems engineering tests. The course includes hands-on experimentation utilizing nano-satellite educational kits.

BME 722: Introduction to Biorobotics (3 credits)

Biorobotics combines human anatomy and physiology, electronics, mechanics and robotics technology using computer programming. It is being investigated for use in prosthetics, surgical and therapeutic devices. Course includes robotic principles, theories and control strategies used to manipulate various robotics devices through human physiological signals in real time. Covers topics on robotics in BME, prosthetics, biosignal processing, microcontroller programming, human sense of touch and virtual world communication. Fundamental knowledge of bioinstrumentation, rehabilitation, robotics and signal processing is demonstrated in the laboratory to create a human-machine-computer interface. Students gain hands-on experience with sensors, microcontrollers, actuators, haptic controllers, robotic arm, prosthetic hand and various MATLAB/Simulink toolboxes in order to implement biorobotics algorithms into 3D simulation and stationary/automobile robotic devices. Prerequisite: BME 480 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 795: Earth and Space Physics (3 credits)

Cross-listed as PHYS 795. An introduction to the geosciences and astrophysics of the solar system. Topics include the surface, interior and atmospheres of the planets with a comparative planetology approach, and the sun-planet system including solar physics and the effect of the sun on the earth's environment and geologic history. Prerequisites:?PHYS 313-314, and MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructor's consent. 

PHYS 595: Astrophysics (3 credits)

Covers the formation, life and death of stars. Topics include: HR-diagrams, atomic and molecular spectra, radiative and convective transfer, the structure and spectra of stellar atmospheres, and stellar evolution. Prerequisite: PHYS 551.

PHYS 701F: Astrophysics II (3 credits)

Continuation of PHYS 595. Covers the properties of the solar system and extra-solar planets. Other topics of modern astronomy are included such as the formation of galaxies, cosmology and the Big Bang model. Prerequisite: PHYS 595 or instructor’s consent.

PHYS 795: Earth and Space Physics (3 credits)

Cross-listed as GEOL 795. An introduction to the geosciences and astrophysics of the solar system. Topics include the surface, interior and atmospheres of the planets with a comparative planetology approach, and the sun-planet system including solar physics and the effect of the sun on the earth's environment and geologic history. Prerequisites: PHYS 313-314, and MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructor's consent. 

PHYS 895: Advanced Astrophysics (3 credits)

Covers topics in astrophysics in relation to stellar structure, atmospheres and stellar evolution. Advanced topics in galactic dynamics, formation and cosmology may be included. Prerequisite: PHYS 595 or instructor's consent.

Scholarship, Fellowship, and Internship Opportunities

NASA Space Technology Research Fellowships (NSTRF)

From the NSTRF website: "The goal of NSTRF is to sponsor U.S. citizen and permanent resident graduate students who show significant potential to contribute to NASA’s goal of creating innovative new space technologies for our Nation’s science, exploration and economic future. NASA Space Technology Fellows will perform innovative, space technology research at their respective campuses and at NASA Centers and/or at nonprofit U.S. Research and Development (R&D) laboratories. Awards are made in the form of training grants to accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees, with the faculty advisor serving as the principal investigator."

NASA Internships

From the NASA Interships website: "NASA Internships are competitive awards to support educational opportunities that provide unique NASA-related research and operational experiences for high school, undergraduate, and graduate students, as well as educators. These opportunities serve students by integrating interns with career professionals emphasizing mentor-directed, degree-related tasks, while contributing to the operation of a NASA facility or the advancement of NASA's missions."

Air Force Research Laboratory Scholars Program (AFRL)

From the AFRL Website: "The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Scholars Program offers stipend-paid summer internship opportunities to undergraduate and graduate level university students pursuing STEM degrees, as well as upper-level high school students; select locations also offer internships to university students pursuing education-related degrees and K-12 professional educators. The selected interns gain valuable hands-on experiences working with full-time AFRL scientists and engineers on cutting-edge research and technology and are able to contribute to unique, research-based projects. Graduate interns are able to collaborate with AFRL on current research and incorporate the research into their graduate work."